food stamps

Food Stamp Program Makes Fresh Produce More Affordable

Jan 16, 2018

Rebeca Gonzalez grew up eating artichokes from her grandmother's farm in the central Mexican state of Tlaxcala. But for years after emigrating to the U.S., she did not feed them to her own kids because the spiky, fibrous vegetables were too expensive on this side of the border.

When she prepared meals at her family's home in Garden Grove, Calif., Gonzalez would also omit avocados, a staple of Mexican cuisine that are often costly here.

The delivery of federal food benefits for millions of low-income people is likely to change after the U.S. Department of Agriculture announced Tuesday it'll allow states more flexibility in how they dole out the money.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN News

Senior citizens and people with disabilities who have pre-registered online will be able to conduct the qualifying interviews to receive Disaster Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program (D-SNAP)   aid over the phone starting this weekend, according to an announcement of the Florida Department of Children and Families (DCF), which administers the program in the state.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

There is still a chance for some people to sign up for D-SNAP disaster food assistance in the wake of Hurricane Irma.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN News

Lines were moving much more quickly at Hard Rock Stadium at mid-day Thursday, the final day to register for disaster food assistance (D-SNAP) in Miami-Dade and Broward counties.

After reaching capacity early Wednesday amid accounts of people passing out in the heat, the registration sites seemed to have finally gotten into the swing of things Thursday.

Sweaty and eager to be done waiting in line, most were just happy to get the assistance they walked away with, ranging between $192 and $1,153.

JOE CAVARETTA / Sun Sentinel

Thousands of people converged on two of South Florida’s sports sites for the final day of sign-ups for Hurricane Irma food stamps.

Sign-ups for the Food for Florida program run through 7 p.m. at Hard Rock Stadium in Miami Gardens and the BB&T Center in Sunrise.

More than 38,000 families have registered at Hard Rock Stadium for the disaster food program since sign-ups started Tuesday, according to DCF.

People waiting in line
Caitie Switalski / WLRN

On the first day of make-up registration for disaster food assistance, lines were long, while lawyers who were suing over how the program has been rolled out hashed things out in court.

Matias Ocner / Miami Herald

For those impacted by Hurricane Irma who missed out on getting emergency food stamps earlier this month from the Florida Department of Children and Families, there will be a second chance.

On Monday, DCF announced Disaster Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (DSNAP) benefits will be distributed during a three-day span at a Miami-Dade and Broward site.


Today in Sundial: Tens of thousands of South Florida residents are still in need of food assistance more than a month after Hurricane Irma smashed through the region. Recently, people waited in lines for hours to qualify for D-Snap, a federal program being facilitated by the Florida Department of Children and Families.

State officials say they have distributed more than $1 billion worth of food assistance following Hurricane Irma.

Peter Haden / WLRN

As Floridians continue lining up for food assistance due to hardships caused by Hurricane Irma, state officials announced they intend to re-open enrollment in two South Florida counties to meet demand.

Roberto Koltun / Miami Herald

Over the weekend, several food assistance centers in Miami-Dade and Broward were abruptly shut down by local and state officials because of “health and safety concerns,” turning away thousands who lined up for the benefits.

Authorities said the crowd was just too overwhelming, leaving gridlocked streets at a standstill. Medics and police had to respond to many cases of heat exhaustion, as well as fights among “frustrated participants” applying for D-SNAP, the Department of Children and Families’ Disaster Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Kendrix Haynes lost a lot in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma: all his food and his pet bearded dragon, Rocky. It was the power (or rather the lack of it). Without it, his refrigerator couldn’t stay cold enough and the heat lamp wasn't hot enough. 

Updated at 3:02 p.m. ET.

The Trump administration says it can balance the federal budget within a decade. Its proposal calls for significant cuts to social safety net programs and assumes more robust economic growth.

The administration released what it calls a "Taxpayer First" budget on Tuesday.

"This is, I think, the first time in a long time that an administration has written a budget through the eyes of the people who are actually paying the taxes," White House Budget Director Mick Mulvaney told reporters in a briefing on Monday.