food

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

The soda aisle in most grocery stores in South Florida looks different than a lot of other places in the United States. Bottles of Jupiña and Postobon  along with cans of Materva and Ironbeer pop out from the shelves in bright colors. For many people in South Florida, these are flavors of hold, companions to meals served hundreds of miles away from South Florida.

Fun fact about the newsroom at WFPL, the NPR member station in Louisville, Ky., where I work: It is fully stocked with lots of candy. Mini-chocolate bars, peanut butter cups, Jolly Ranchers — the list goes on and the candy bowl is constantly being refilled.

Then last week, a gigantic bag of gummy bears appeared. Which led to this question from our digital editor, Jonese Franklin: "Do gummy bears really come in different flavors, or do we just think they taste different because they are different colors?"

WLRN / Jessica Bakeman

In elementary schools throughout Miami-Dade County, students snack on cranberry hibiscus during class and eat lemongrass-infused rice in the cafeteria.

They help grow the fresh fruits and vegetables themselves in on-campus gardens. 

Looking for a diet that is simple to follow? You might want to give the Mediterranean diet a try.

It's not so much a prescriptive meal plan as it is a well-balanced pattern of eating. Think lots of whole grains, vegetables, beans, nuts, olive oil, fish and smaller amounts of dairy, poultry and even a little red wine (if you like).

Eating Iguanas In Southwest Florida With Jackson Landers

Dec 28, 2017
Courtesy of Jackson Landers

This story was originally published on August 8, 2013. 

Jackson Landers grew up in a vegetarian household. Now he hunts and butchers much of his own meat. In the past five years, he's focused on hunting and eating invasive species.

In his book, Eating Aliens: One Man's Adventures Eating and Hunting Invasive Species, the 35-year-old Landers chronicles his travels around the country as he learns to hunt, butcher and eat various invasive species.

Contaminated food is taking too long to be removed from store shelves, according to a report issued by the inspector general of the Department of Health and Human Services.

The report says the Food and Drug Administration "did not always have an efficient and effective food-recall process that ensured the safety of the nation's food supply."

Federal investigators reviewed 30 of 1,557 food recalls between 2012 and 2015.

Americans Love Spices. So Why Don't We Grow Them?

Dec 26, 2017

Nutmeg, cinnamon and cloves are probably ramping up in importance in your spice cabinet right about now — the classic flavors of the winter season. But while you might be shopping for local ingredients for your favorite recipes for eggnog or maple-glazed ham, the odds are that the spices you're using were imported from the other side of the world.

Lior Lev Sercarz thinks spices should be local, too.

Nadege Green / WLRN

After I reported a story about the popularity of Manischewitz wine in Caribbean communities during the holidays, many of our readers and listeners responded back-- mostly people who came from non-Jewish households that embraced the kosher wine.

According to the Wall Street journal, Latin America, the Caribbean and South Korea are among the top export markets for the wine. 

The Florida Constitution will be revised come the new year. The Constitution Revision Commission is in charge of the revision, which takes place every 20 years. 

Ask any Swede and they'll tell you that a smörgåsbord table without herring is (gasp) unthinkable. While there are other foods they may rattle off as equally important — gravlax, cured ham, meatballs and rice pudding — it's these tiny, pickled fish that are the backbone of the elaborate buffet, which likely traces its roots back to high-society gatherings in the 1500s.

Tim Padgett / WLRN.org

This month, when you walk into a Colombian café in Kendall called La Candelaria, you’re met by música decembrina. December music. Meaning, Colombian Navidad or Christmas music. Old-time cumbia favorites like “El Año Viejo.”

Most young people are concerned with juggling academic responsibilities, chores and maintaining a respectable social life. But there is always an exception to the norm. Meet Delaney Reynolds, published author, environmentalist and freshman at the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science. She is the founder of the Sink or Swim project, an initiative determined to raise awareness about sea-level rise and climate change. 

If I spot a blade of interesting-looking grass, my first inclination isn't to wonder what it tastes like. But a group of researchers in Australia recently stumbled upon two new species of grass with a peculiar flavor that some liken to a favorite snacking combo: salt and vinegar chips.

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