Florida wildlife

State wildlife officials say human-bear interactions are on the rise, and they’re trying to educate Floridians on ways to defuse those situations. 

The Florida Wildlife Federation is pushing for stiffer poaching penalties after a shark dragging video went viral.

FWC

On holidays like the Fourth of July, Floridians like to head to the beach. But state wildlife officials are reminding the public that some local residents are already there.

Shorebirds and sea turtles nest on beaches. A lot of shorebird species are listed as threatened and all the bird species are protected. The same goes for sea turtles.

Loud noises can cause adult birds to fly away from nests, and tiny chicks can get separated from their parents.

Back in 2012 and 2015, three environmentalists hiked, biked and kayaked a thousand miles across Florida - first, from the Everglades north to the Okefenokee Swamp in Georgia, then from the headwaters of the Everglades, through the Panhandle, to the Alabama state line. Their mission - to publicize the need to connect the state's dwindling natural lands before they're developed forever.

Wildlife officials say 520 manatees died in Florida last year, including a record 104 killed by boat strikes.

Creative Commons via Flickr / Users: Adam Axon, USDA, William Warby and John Tann

What happens when you expose a Florida resident to mosquitoes, screw worms or gators?

Creative Commons via Flickr / psyberartist (https://flic.kr/p/7xiU9C)

The manatee is a sort of Florida symbol - their squished noses and doughy bodies are just objectively one of the cutest things in our waters.

But this year boats have killed a record number of the sea cows, 98 in total. This beats the previous record set in 2009 when 97 were killed.

In total, 472 manatees have died in 2016, far fewer than the 830 in 2013, many from natural causes. The nature of 139 deaths is undetermined.

Florida wildlife authorities approved new protected areas Wednesday for some of the state’s most iconic and imperiled bird species.

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission is meeting in Saint Augustine to discuss, among other things, budget requests for the coming year.

Florida wildlife officials are investigating the illegal painting of another animal. After recent reports about turtles, now officials are seeing the same thing happen to a particular bird.

FWC

Florida wildlife officials are asking the public for its help in deciding rules for venomous reptiles.

Through an online survey, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) has six questions for the public about non-native and native venomous reptiles.

For example, FWC’s Captive Wildlife Section Capt. Kara Hooker says the survey asks 'should they be kept in zoos?'

Snakes and lizards and crocodiles, oh my!

All of these creatures, which include Burmese pythons and carnivorous lizards, have turned up in Florida in recent years, sparking concerns about possible damage from invasive species and questions about how the nonnative animals came to be in the state.

Lt. David Carey / Monroe County Sheriff's Office

An Islamorada homeowner woke up Thursday morning to find an uninvited guest in the pool — an American crocodile.

The Lower Matecumbe resident called the Monroe County Sheriff's Office. Deputies called in the Florida Fish & Wildlife Commission. Together, the law enforcement officers removed the croc, estimated to be about 8 feet long, and returned it to its natural habitat: saltwater.

Pointing to increased numbers of manatees and improved habitat, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said Thursday it wants to change the status of the sea cows from endangered to threatened.

Protesters Rally Against Upcoming Bear Hunt

Oct 20, 2015
Audrey Armitage

  Dozens of protesters gathered at Lummus Park in Miami Beach on Saturday in opposition to the statewide bear hunt set to take place Oct. 24-30. Organized by a network of volunteers called “Stop the Bear Hunt,” the rally was one of many protests happening across the state.

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