Florida Supreme Court

Creative Commons via Flickr / Joe Gratz (https://flic.kr/p/bkUna)

As South Florida voters go to the polls this week during early voting or at your precinct on election day Tuesday, you’ll see a bunch of judicial races listed on your ballot:

Miami-Dade 11th Judicial Circuit Judge Groups 9, 34, 52, 66 and 74;

Broward 17th Judicial Circuit Judge Groups 9, 15, 23 and 24

Palm Beach 15th Judicial Circuit Judge Groups 1 and 4

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Miami-Dade County Judge Groups 5, 7, 15 and 35

Monroe County Judge Group 3

Broward County Judge Groups 2, 3, 7, 8, 13, 14 and 21

It’s now up to the Florida Supreme Court to decide whether a pari-mutuel in Gretna should get to have slot machines.

Florida Department of Corrections

NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDA/TALLAHASSEE

Hours after listening to arguments about the impact of a U.S. Supreme Court decision that struck down the state's death-penalty sentencing system, the Florida Supreme Court issued an indefinite stay of execution for Cary Michael Lambrix, who had been scheduled to die Feb. 11.

Tuesday's unanimous order also denied Lambrix's request to send the case to a lower court, meaning the Florida Supreme Court is likely to weigh in on the sentencing issue.

Fl. Supreme Court Schedules Death Penalty Arguments

Jan 18, 2016

The Florida Supreme Court has refused to grant a stay in an execution scheduled for next month but ordered oral arguments to hear about the potential impact of a seminal U.S. Supreme Court decision this week striking down the state's death penalty sentencing structure.

Florida Supreme Court via Miami Herald

Former Chief Justice Leander Shaw, who died last week at age 85, lay in state Monday in the rotunda of the Florida Supreme Court as family, friends and colleagues paid their respects.

A Florida Highway Patrol honor guard carried his coffin in from rain-soaked Duval Street, with former Chief Justice Major Harding leading the way.

Shaw, the state's first black chief justice, served two decades on the court, figuring in high-profile cases and beating back an effort to unseat him.

He also triumphed over Florida's Jim Crow-era legal system.

BRUCE BREWER / AP

When Leander Shaw took the Florida Bar exam in 1960, he was not allowed to stay or eat at the whites-only hotel in Miami where the exam was administered.

Three decades later, Shaw became the first black chief justice of the Florida Supreme Court.

Shaw, whose career included working as a public defender, prosecutor, and appeals-court judge before serving on the Supreme Court, died Monday at age 85. A statement from the Supreme Court said Shaw had suffered from a lengthy illness.

Solar Energy Tampa Florida/flickr

Florida Supreme Court Justice Barbara Pariente, more than once Tuesday, advised lawyers that arguments about a proposed constitutional amendment to expand the use of solar energy leaned toward campaign rhetoric rather than key legal issues.

Still, when justices finished hearing arguments about ballot language proposed by the group Floridians for Solar Choice, supporters and opponents of the controversial initiative emerged from the Supreme Court offering positive spins.

Fammy/ Flickr

Florida’s congressional districts map just got shaken up. Again.

On Thursday, the Florida Supreme Court ruled 5-2 that eight congressional districts be redrawn before the 2016 elections.

Florida Department of Corrections

Florida’s lethal injection procedure is constitutional according to a decision out Monday from the U.S. Supreme Court, the final day of decisions for this term.

The Glossip case challenged the use of one drug in the lethal injection procedure in Oklahoma, but Florida is the only other state that uses virtually the same means to execute death row inmates.

 

Roberto Koltun, El Nuevo Herald

A Miami-Dade County judge accused of misconduct has accepted the punishment recommended by the Florida Supreme Court.

Judge Jacqueline Schwartz will pay a $10,000 fine and be out of work for a month without pay.

Creative Commons via Flickr / Boston Public Library (https://flic.kr/p/dm18Ao)

The Florida Supreme Court has reached a groundbreaking decision about inmates who were sentenced to mandatory life in prison without parole for crimes they committed while they were still kids.

The decision makes 2012's Miller v. Alabama apply retroactively. It was a U.S. Supreme Court decision that ruled mandatory life sentences without the opportunity for release were cruel and unusual.

For the past three years, 201 Florida inmates have been in a kind of limbo. They're inmates who were sentenced to life in prison without parole as juveniles before the Miller ruling.

Bill Would Clear Way For Recordings In Sexual-Abuse Cases

Dec 24, 2014

Moving quickly after the Florida Supreme Court ordered a new trial for a man convicted of sexually abusing his stepdaughter, a state lawmaker Friday filed a bill that would allow secretly recorded conversations to be used as evidence in such cases.

Florida Department of Corrections

UPDATE 6/19/2014 -- John Henry's execution was temporarily delayed waiting for a last-minute appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court which was denied. Henry was pronounced dead at 7:43pm.

Eddie Davis is the next person scheduled to be executed in the state. That will take place on July 10th.

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Florida is on track to execute its first inmate since the flawed and controversial execution in Oklahoma that led to an inmate’s heart attack.

Creative Commons / Flickr user Phil Roeder

The U.S. Supreme Court has chosen not to rule on a ground-breaking case out of Florida. Pitting Tobacco companies against smokers, this seems to be one strike against the corporations.

In 2006, the Florida Supreme Court ruled against big tobacco companies in a decision that has come to be known as the Engle Case. Life-long smoker, physician, and Miami-Beach resident Howard Engle was the lead plaintiff.

Fammy on flickr

On the day his successor takes power, a defeated or departing Florida governor would be allowed to appoint replacements for state Supreme Court justices whose terms expire on the same day.  That's in a controversial bill the state Senate passed on Thursday. And that governor could be Rick Scott four years from now, when the court's liberal majority face mandatory retirement all at once.

Click to hear Rick Stone's radio story.

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