Florida prisons

Florida Department of Corrections

Florida’s lethal injection procedure is constitutional according to a decision out Monday from the U.S. Supreme Court, the final day of decisions for this term.

The Glossip case challenged the use of one drug in the lethal injection procedure in Oklahoma, but Florida is the only other state that uses virtually the same means to execute death row inmates.

 

Florida Department of Corrections

Over the last several years, European drug manufacturers have tried to limit the use of their products in lethal injection executions. As a result, death penalty states were left scrambling to find replacements.

In 2013, Florida began using a new drug called midazolam that is now the subject of a U.S. Supreme Court case: Glossip v. Gross. The state, which has one of the most active active death chambers, has halted all executions for the past six months awaiting a decision on the case.

Patti Mazzei / Miami Herald

Gov. Rick Scott's office is continuing to deny that the administration unofficially banned the use of the terms "climate change" and "global warming" after former state employees said they were told not to use those words. 

DOC NYC/flickr

In the early 1980s, a series of escapes earned Mark DeFriest the nickname Prison Houdini.

In 1979, DeFriest was a 19-year-old mechanic living in a rural area outside of Tallahassee. Then he was arrested for stealing his own tools -- the tools were inherited from his father, but DeFriest took them before his father’s will had gone through probate. His stepmother called the police, and DeFriest fled. That began his decades-long odyssey behind bars.

Scott For Florida

Update: Due to many calls and comments, this entire edition of the Florida Roundup discussed renewed police scrutiny. 

POLICE PROTESTS

South Florida demonstrators marched against police-related violence last weekend. More protests are planned after a street artist died running from police and getting hit by an unmarked Miami squad car. 

NEW CHIEFS

  Today on WLRN-Miami Herald News, you heard:

On the Florida Roundup, President Obama will not take executive action on immigration until after the midterm elections, breaking a pledge he made in June. We will discuss how this will affect votes in our swing state.

Bob Jagendorf / Wikimedia

Miami-Dade County officials are calling on Gov. Rick Scott to investigate the death of a mentally ill inmate at Dade Correctional Institute.

Darren Rainey was found dead two years ago in a closet-size shower stall. He had been put there and left for two hours in scalding-hot water as punishment.

Sen. Dwight Bullard organized a press conference at Mount Sinai Missionary Baptist Church this week to address law enforcement misdoings.

He says people deserve the right to live, whether they are inmates, individuals looking for federal assistance or workers.

The Florida Roundup: The Problems In Prisons

Jul 11, 2014

 

It has been two years since the death of a mentally ill prison inmate in a scalding-hot shower. No one has been charged in that death; the two officers who allegedly punished him with the shower are still working at the facility. The head of the corrections department says he's frustrated that an investigation isn't finished yet. But many question why his outrage about the death comes only now.

Miami-Dade’s mayor proposes a budget keeping the county tax rates steady but could cut jobs and hours for some county services.

Today on WLRN-Miami Herald News, you heard:

    

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