Florida Legislature

Florida Senate Tees Up Gun Safety Legislation For Monday Vote

Mar 4, 2018

The Florida Senate held a rare Saturday session, discussing legislation aimed at making schools safer, following the February 14th mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland that left 14 students and three faculty members dead.

Will Florida join most of the rest of the country and place an outright ban on texting and driving? Probably not anytime soon.

Firefighters, police officers and other first responders could get workers' compensation benefits for post-traumatic stress disorder under a bill passed by the Florida Senate.

A Florida bill to assist first responders suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder has found new life in the aftermath of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting.

Senate Could Sign Off On ALF Generator Requirement

Mar 2, 2018

The Florida Senate is going where the House won’t when it comes to generators. 

An average of fourteen people die every day from opioid related abuse. That’s according to Stuart Republican Representative Gayle Harrell.

She’s glad to see a measure moving through the legislature that aims to curb opioid abuse. The House version ensures doctors and pharmacies use the PDMP or Prescription Drug Monitoring Program database before prescribing or dispensing an opioid. It also allows Florida to share its information across state lines to help cut down on so called doctor shopping. Rep. Jim Boyd (R-Bradenton) says another provision limits the number of pills a doctor can prescribe.

The Florida House and Senate will vote Friday on similar bills that would make it easier for first responders dealing with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) to get the treatment they need.

The chambers will vote on HB 227 and SB 376. The similar bills are aimed at revising compensation for first responders dealing with job-related PTSD.

Terence Shepherd / WLRN News

A controversial proposal that would allow armed teachers in schools has led to bipartisan bickering and prompted accusations that people in both parties are making political pawns of victims of this month’s catastrophic shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School that left 14 students and three faculty members dead.

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Addiction specialists and law enforcement officials are pleading with Florida House members to keep funding for an injectable opioid-addiction treatment.

 

The House’s proposed budget zeroes out funding for Vivitrol, a drug that blocks opioid receptors in the brain for 30 days.

 

A measure that would expand Florida’s rules on issuing threats is moving forward. Officials are pointing to the many copycat threats made following the school shooting in Parkland as a reason for why the change is needed. 

Jessica Bakeman / WLRN

About 40 Parkland moms — and at least one dad and one kid — had a long, grueling day at the Capitol in Tallahassee on Tuesday. They waited for hours to speak to committees, struggled to understand last-minute amendments added to bills and strategized in the hallways between meetings with the governor and members of the Legislature.

The trip followed a higher profile one the week before from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School students after the Feb. 14 shooting there that left 17 dead and more than a dozen others injured.

Florida House, Senate Poised To Negotiate Tighter Budget

Feb 27, 2018
News Service of Florida

House and Senate leaders have taken a key step toward starting negotiations on a new budget — but face hundreds of millions of dollars in unexpected costs and less tax revenue than originally thought.

Senate Appropriations Chairman Rob Bradley, R-Fleming Island, said Tuesday leaders have reached agreement on “allocations,” which are big-picture numbers for the various parts of the budget such as education, health care and criminal justice. House and Senate negotiators will use those numbers as they hammer out details of each budget area.

Jessica Bakeman / WLRN

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Senate Minority Leader Oscar Braynon wants to create a $10 million program that would reimburse trauma centers for care provided to victims of mass shootings, and Senate President Joe Negron said he will support the effort. 

Braynon wants to create a fund in the Attorney General’s Office, with money coming from a portion of fees collected from new or renewed concealed-weapons licenses. The program would reimburse trauma centers that treat victims of mass shootings, such as the Feb. 14 attack at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland that left 17 people dead. 

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