Florida budget

Florida Gov. Rick Scott wants the state's highway patrol troopers, wildlife officers and law-enforcement agents to get another pay raise.


Carl Juste / Miami Herald

Gov. Rick Scott faces mounting pressure from school superintendents, teachers unions and parent groups to veto $23.7 billion in base funding to K-12 public schools next year — as well as a controversial $419 million education policy bill, which lawmakers unveiled and passed in the span of just three days at the end of their annual session.

A rejection of the main education funding alone would force lawmakers back to Tallahassee for a special session to redo that part of the budget, which is almost a third of the $82.4 billion in overall state spending approved for 2017-18.

This past state legislative session, Florida’s beaches got the most funding for renourishment than they have in more than a decade: $50 million. 

Florida's top Republican legislative leaders said Wednesday that they finally reached a deal on a new budget that should clear the way for them to end their session early next week.


SCOTT KEELER / TAMPA BAY TIMES

House Speaker Richard Corcoran and Senate President Joe Negron separately told their members Wednesday morning that they had reached a deal on a new $83 billion state budget.

“We have reached agreement with the Senate,” Corcoran told House members.

Neither Corcoran nor Negron, R-Stuart, have met publicly to discuss unresolved budget differences, many of which were in health care, higher education, K-12 public schools and environmental spending and policy.

The Republican-dominated Legislature will need extra time to finish work on the state budget for the second time in three years, as lawmakers ended Tuesday with no agreement on an $83 billion spending plan for the year beginning July 1.

Negotiations between House Speaker Richard Corcoran, Senate President Joe Negron and their budget chiefs failed to work out a final deal that would allow the annual legislative session to end on Friday, as scheduled.

AP Photo/Steve Cannon

By the time you read this, Florida lawmakers may have a proposed budget agreement. That's how fast multi-billion dollar decisions are made in the final hours of the Florida legislative session.

The state budget needs to land by late Tuesday in order for legislators to vote on it by Friday, the scheduled end of the regularly scheduled 2017 session. If there's a spending plan that passes the House and Senate and Gov. Rick Scott agrees to it, there won't be a need for a special session to come up with the budget before the beginning of the next fiscal year in July.

The Florida House and Senate budget teams are bumping numerous issues up to the chambers’ presiding officers.  The groups bundled a few major priorities for up or down votes ahead of the floor.

WUSF News

With three weeks left before the end of the regularly scheduled legislative session, the two chambers of the Florida Legislature are about $4 billion apart in their spending plans. While the gap is closing, the fundamental position of the top budget lawmaker in the House is to shrink state spending.

Senate Democrats are huddling to discuss proposed changes to nursing home funding.  Nick Evans reports the chamber’s spending plan alters the way Medicaid dollars flow to facilities.

House budget subcommittees are unveiling their ideas for spending cuts.  House leaders ordered each panel develop a list of potential reductions in light of a grim budget outlook.

A squabble among Republican leaders in the state legislature has some people talking about a possible government shutdown.

Kate Stein / WLRN

Florida Gov. Rick Scott was in Miami on Wednesday to tout the $10 billion  in transportation spending he’s included in his proposed budget for 2017-2018.

 

The governor spoke at PortMiami surrounded by dozens of orange-vested workers -- some of the more than 200-thousand employees he said the port supports.

 

Palm Beach Aggregates, LLC

The budget proposed by Florida's governor could increase potable water supplies in Broward and Palm Beach counties.

 

Gov. Rick Scott requested that legislators allocate $20 million towards construction of the C-51 reservoir in Palm Beach County. That reservoir is not directly related to much-debated reservoirs intended to reduce discharges from Lake Okeechobee. But officials say it could provide South Florida residents with more drinking water -- much of it from stormwater.

 

House Republicans are looking for cuts to rein in a Florida budget they see as out of control.  

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