Florida budget

Nursing Homes Get Boost In Senate Budget

Jan 25, 2018

Nursing homes would get a nearly 4 percent increase in what they are paid to treat frail, elderly Floridians, while $318 million in Medicaid funding would be redistributed among the state’s hospitals, under a proposed spending plan released Wednesday by a Senate budget panel.

Al Diaz / Miami Herald

Just months after seeing the budget for the state tourism marketing agency cut to $75 million amid a cantankerous political fight, Gov. Rick Scott is asking again for a major boost.

Property Tax Money Could Be Key In Education Budget

Dec 8, 2017

Education Commissioner Pam Stewart told a Senate budget panel Thursday that funding would be “woefully short” next year if lawmakers do not use an increase in property tax collections to support schools.

Gov. Rick Scott stopped at a Tampa elementary school Monday morning, touting what he called a record budget for education. Scott may not get what he wants from lawmakers, but he vowed to push forward, anyway.

Governor Rick Scott says he wants about $200 million for Florida families who adopt foster kids.

Florida Gov. Rick Scott during his final year in office wants fees and taxes cut by $180 million.

The outlook is grim again for Florida’s budget drafters—and that’s before considering the cost of Hurricane Irma.  State forecasters are warning the coffers are nearly empty for the third year running.

Florida Gov. Rick Scott wants the state's highway patrol troopers, wildlife officers and law-enforcement agents to get another pay raise.


Carl Juste / Miami Herald

Gov. Rick Scott faces mounting pressure from school superintendents, teachers unions and parent groups to veto $23.7 billion in base funding to K-12 public schools next year — as well as a controversial $419 million education policy bill, which lawmakers unveiled and passed in the span of just three days at the end of their annual session.

A rejection of the main education funding alone would force lawmakers back to Tallahassee for a special session to redo that part of the budget, which is almost a third of the $82.4 billion in overall state spending approved for 2017-18.

This past state legislative session, Florida’s beaches got the most funding for renourishment than they have in more than a decade: $50 million. 

Florida's top Republican legislative leaders said Wednesday that they finally reached a deal on a new budget that should clear the way for them to end their session early next week.


SCOTT KEELER / TAMPA BAY TIMES

House Speaker Richard Corcoran and Senate President Joe Negron separately told their members Wednesday morning that they had reached a deal on a new $83 billion state budget.

“We have reached agreement with the Senate,” Corcoran told House members.

Neither Corcoran nor Negron, R-Stuart, have met publicly to discuss unresolved budget differences, many of which were in health care, higher education, K-12 public schools and environmental spending and policy.

The Republican-dominated Legislature will need extra time to finish work on the state budget for the second time in three years, as lawmakers ended Tuesday with no agreement on an $83 billion spending plan for the year beginning July 1.

Negotiations between House Speaker Richard Corcoran, Senate President Joe Negron and their budget chiefs failed to work out a final deal that would allow the annual legislative session to end on Friday, as scheduled.

AP Photo/Steve Cannon

By the time you read this, Florida lawmakers may have a proposed budget agreement. That's how fast multi-billion dollar decisions are made in the final hours of the Florida legislative session.

The state budget needs to land by late Tuesday in order for legislators to vote on it by Friday, the scheduled end of the regularly scheduled 2017 session. If there's a spending plan that passes the House and Senate and Gov. Rick Scott agrees to it, there won't be a need for a special session to come up with the budget before the beginning of the next fiscal year in July.

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