The floods that hit Louisiana last month were caused by rainfall that was unlike anything seen there in centuries. Most of the southern part of the state was drenched with up to 2 or 3 inches in an hour. A total of 31 inches fell just northeast of Baton Rouge in about three days; 20 parishes were declared federal disaster areas.

Climate scientists and flood managers suspect there could more like that to come — in Louisiana and in other parts of the country.

Public health advocates who are exasperated by the fight on Capitol Hill over how much to spend to combat the Zika virus are looking longingly at the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

FEMA has a standing fund that it can draw upon when disaster strikes. The fund is replenished when the money is spent cleaning up from hurricanes, tornadoes and other natural disasters.

Rick Stone

At the Fort Lauderdale Fire Department, Rit the fire dog is dying for his first real-world assignment. The firefighters want to see it, too, but that means they'd have to wish for the kind of disaster that leaves human survivors hidden in rubble and wreckage.

So, they’re happy to wait for Rit's chance to do his stuff. It may not be long.

Sinkhole Maps Will Show State's Vulnerability

Nov 19, 2013
Florida Geological Survey

Florida is susceptible to sinkholes because so much of our landscape sits on rocks that dissolve easily, such as limestone.

The Florida Geological Survey is building a map to show the risk of sinkholes around the state. The project is the result of what happened last year after Tropical Storm Debby.