family

We'll have a total of just 10 at our Thanksgiving this year, with the biggest absence being that of my mother, who died in March at the age of 92. Our 2-year-old granddaughter and her parents won't be there, either, nor will my nephew and his 6-month-old son, so we'll have no children around to temper the loss. Instead, we'll have to get our yuks from the antics of our daughter's 90-pound dog, Huxley.

After A Suicide, Sibling Survivors Are Often Overlooked

Aug 25, 2017

When Taylor Porco's brother, Jordan, died by suicide during his freshman year of college in February 2011, people told her to be strong for her parents, who were incapacitated by their grief. Hardly anyone seemed to notice that Porco, only 14 at the time, was suffering and suicidal.

"I was really depressed and in such extreme pain. Nothing, literally, mattered to me after he died. All I wanted was my brother back. I never loved someone as much as I loved him," she says.

Hispanics in the United States have a longer life expectancy, but a poll finds few older Latinos are confident that nursing homes and assisted living facilities can meet their needs.

At a childbirth class at Doula Love in Portland, Ore., a half-dozen pregnant women lean on yoga balls. Their partners are right behind them, learning how to apply pressure for a pelvic massage. Together, they go over the stages of labor, birthing positions, and breathing techniques.

Cole Cooney, who is expecting his second child, says he can't imagine missing the birth. Not just because he'd miss meeting his child, but because he'd miss the opportunity to help his wife.

Peter Haden / WLRN

A Royal Palm Beach kindergartner got a big surprise at school Thursday: Her dad.

Army Specialist Johnnie Duce surprised his daughter Aliana during singing practice at Cypress Trails Elementary School.

Duce’s just returned from a nine-month deployment in Kuwait with his infantry unit — the 258th out of Fort Stewart, Georgia.

Somehow we're squeezing 18 people into our apartment for Thanksgiving this year, a year when too many people are worrying about fraught post-election conversations. My relatives, who luckily are all cut from the same political cloth, range in age from my mother, aged 92, to my 32-year-old nephew (my 17-month-old granddaughter's political leanings are still unfolding.)

I love them all, but in a way the one I know best is the middle-aged man across the table whose blue eyes look just like mine: my younger brother Paul.

After a bitter and divisive presidential election, many are approaching Thanksgiving with trepidation, even hoping to avoid politics entirely. WFSU gets some advice on how to find common ground.

Most parents have experienced sticker shock when they find out just how much it will cost to care for their infant or toddler full- or even part-time. For parents who have little choice, this can be a big financial strain.

In fact, the most common challenge parents face when looking for child care is the high cost. That's the finding of a recent poll from NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Amanda Rabines / WLRN

Nearly one hundred south Florida residents gathered to hear medical specialists talk about precautions families should take to protect pregnant women and their unborn children from contracting the Zika virus. 

The talk, called "Zika and Pregnancy: What You Need to Know Now," was organized by Baptist Health Resource Center in their Kendall location last Wednesday. 

Nadege Green / WLRN

Yamille Medina sits in front of a mirror while a makeup artist brushes purple blush onto her cheeks. She cradles her 2-year-old son Antonio in her arms; he’s a bit cranky.

Nearby, a nine-months pregnant woman is picking out a dress from a collection of outfits hanging on a rack. Another woman who had her baby six days ago is having her hair blow-dried.

These women are homeless. They live at the Miami Rescue Mission’s women’s shelter, many with their children. On this day, the women and their children are being treated to a staple of the holiday season: a portrait session.

Saira / Courtesy

The country is grappling with how to handle the influx of Central American children who have come to the United States over the past few months. And as Central America has become more and more violent, more families have been coming to South Florida too.

Over the last year more than 55,000 families were apprehended at the U.S.-Mexico border. That’s almost six times more than the same time period a year ago.

Florida is one of the top five states receiving this influx of immigrants.

Annie Leibovitz

06/09/14 - Monday’s Topical Currents is with writer and lecturer Andrew Solomon.  His latest book, FAR FROM THE TREE:  Parents, Children and the Search for Identity tells the stories of parents who deal with their exceptional children . . . and find profound meaning doing so. Families cope with deafness, dwarfism, autism, schizophrenia, children conceived in rape, kids who become criminals and transgendered individuals. Solomon tells how diversity makes parents more imaginative and understanding. Don’t miss Topical Currents Monday at 1pm.

Take Stock In Children Miami

Jan 9, 2014
https://www.facebook.com/TSIChildren

01/09/14 - Thursday's Topical Currents begins with a look at the non-profit “Take Stock In Children” organization.  It provides children of low-income families with mentors . . .  from entrance to middle school through high school.  College transition and scholarships are in the mix as well.

littlebluecottage/flickr

A Florida Senate committee has approved a bill cracking down on parents who illegally put their children up for adoption.

The practice often involves children who were adopted from other countries.

It's called "rehoming," and it puts kids into new families -- for free. The kids are typically offered for adoption on the Internet by parents who just don’t want them anymore.

New homes are back in a big way — literally. This summer, a typical new house in Phoenix was more than 20 percent larger than a resale home as builders across the country added more space to accommodate post-recession lifestyles.

Take Jacque Ruggles' family, for example. Four women from three generations live under one roof.

"I'm the matriarch," Ruggles says. "I'm grandma."