Environmental Protection Agency

Kate Stein / WLRN

A chemical used for mosquito control in South Florida has been the source of controversy in recent weeks, after a study showed it could be linked to developmental delays in infants.

Kyle Holsten / WLRN

When he had a landscaping business, Bob Hartmann grew 200,000 orchids and thousands of other plants on his three acres in Southwest Ranches, about 15 miles southwest of Fort Lauderdale.

 


Huffington Post

 

On Tuesday morning, the U.S. House Appropriations Committee is expected to vote in favor of a bill cutting the EPA's budget by 7 percent. The Environmental Defense Fund and its partner advocacy organization, EDF Action, are denouncing the move.

 

Logan Riely / Miami Herald

Last year, the pesticide Naled was one of several tools officials used to control mosquitoes that carry the Zika virus. Dr. Michael Hall was one of many Miami Beach residents who protested, saying Naled exposure leads to symptoms like headaches and nausea. He and other protesters also expressed fears the pesticide could have longer-term health effects.

Miami Beach Doctor Files Lawsuit To Stop Mosquito Spraying

Jul 5, 2017
Kate Stein / WLRN

A Miami Beach doctor who last year helped spearhead angry opposition to using the pesticide naled has filed an emergency request in federal court to stop Miami-Dade County from conducting aerial spraying in its seasonal battle against native marsh mosquitoes.

On Monday, the county completed its second flight this season, dosing a large swath of the coast, from the Rickenbacker Causeway south to Florida City, and inland around Kendall and Homestead.

Logan Riely / Miami Herald

Weeks after a study linked a pesticide used for mosquito control to slight motor delays in babies, officials in Miami-Dade and Palm Beach counties say they plan to use that pesticide in aerial spraying scheduled in the coming week.

Florida Atlantic University

A new study by South Florida researchers finds a simple tactic can save a lot of wasted water.

According to the Environmental Protection Agency, around half of household water use in the U.S. is used to water lawns. And much of the time the lawns don’t even need it.

Most South Florida lawns need about one inch of water per week. During the rainy season, the region often gets more rain than that. So the lawns don’t need extra water.  

But most homeowners are not checking a rain gauge every morning.

As part of President Trump's executive order to review "job-killing regulations," the Environmental Protection Agency last month asked for the public's input on what to streamline or cut. It held a series of open-mic meetings and set up a website that has received more than 28,000 comments, many of which urge the agency not to roll back environmental protections.

PR Newswire/AP

President Trump fulfilled one of his big campaign promises on Tuesday: He signed an executive order that directed the Environmental Protection Agency to roll back the Obama administration’s Clean Power Plan.

That plan was intended to cut harmful carbon emissions by replacing coal-fired power plants with renewable energy sources. Trump wants to repeal it as a step towards boosting the struggling coal industry.

But in Florida and across the country, it's doubtful the rollback will have much impact -- positive or negative, says University of Miami economist David Kelly.

R
Joshua Roberts/Reuters 

Scott Pruitt, in his first address to staff since he took over as head of the Environmental Protection Agency, urged civility and said he would “listen, learn and lead.” 

“We ought to be able to get together and wrestle through some very difficult issues and do so in a civil manner,” Pruitt told staffers Tuesday at the EPA headquarters in Washington, DC.

Signaling a shift in the agency’s priorities, Pruitt focused his remarks on creating a pro-business, regulatory environment rather than cleaning up air or water.

USGS, via Wikimedia Commons

A federal ruling issued last week on water transfers could affect the quality of water in South Florida, while potentially saving money for the area's taxpayers.

Scientists at the Environmental Protection Agency who want to publish or present their scientific findings likely will need to have their work reviewed on a "case by case basis" before it can be disseminated, according to a spokesman for the agency's transition team.

Scott Pruitt, Donald Trump's pick to head the Environmental Protection Agency, underscored the importance of federalism in U.S. environmental policy and regulation, and criticized the agency he's being tasked to run, at his confirmation hearing Wednesday.

The Oklahoma attorney general vowed to follow the "rule of law," if confirmed, and promised to "fairly and equitably enforce the rules and not pick winners and losers."

Brennan Linsley / AP via Miami Herald

President-elect Donald Trump has made much of his planned energy policies. He has said he'll boost the coal industry by rolling back President Obama's Clean Power Plan and in a recent video outlining plans for his first 100 days in office, Trump said he wants to expand the shale energy industry as well.

So, how much will these measures impact a state like Florida, swampy and with no coal mines? Not much, according to some experts. 

 

Florida State Parks May Have to Pay Their Way

Feb 16, 2016
The Sierra Club

The Sierra Club is against a bill in a Florida House committee that would allow hunting, lumbering and cattle grazing in state parks in order to increase state revenues.

Though Florida's 161 state parks bring in roughly $60 million annually via 20 million annual visitors, there is currently a $20 million  deficit in the parks’ budget.

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