environment

Environment
11:00 am
Thu July 25, 2013

La. Flood Board Sues Oil Industry Over Wetlands

Canals created for navigation and oil and gas pipelines cut through the marsh off the coast of Louisiana, seen in 2010.
Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 11:49 am

Since the 1930s, Louisiana has lost roughly as much land as makes up the state of Delaware.

"If you put the state of Delaware between New Orleans and the ocean, we wouldn't need any levees at all," says John Barry, vice president of the Southeast Louisiana Flood Protection Authority-East. "There is this large buffer of land that has disappeared, and that buffer makes New Orleans much more vulnerable to hurricanes."

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Environment
1:23 pm
Tue July 23, 2013

Balancing Tourism With Eco-Preservation On Islamorada

Abandoned mosquito trenches have gummed up the natural water flow on the land.
Credit Cammy Clarck/Miami Herald

A proposal to build an eco-friendly resort in the Upper Keys is raising questions about how to marry economic development and environmental preservation.

Coral Springs urologist Dr. Albert Vorstman owns eight acres of land in Islamorada along US-1 that Miami Herald reporter Cammy Clark described in a recent article:

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Community Contributor
7:30 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Rising To Environmental Challenges In America’s Sinking Cities

Credit Flickr photo from VgM8989

As an undergrad at Louisiana State University, I learned quickly what it means to live in a swamp. I left our college newsroom after an all-nighter working a tropical storm and found my car parked behind Tiger Stadium — filled to the stickshift with murky brown water.

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Environment
10:13 am
Mon July 1, 2013

Why Invasive Lionfish Are So Hard To Eradicate From South Florida Waters

The latest tool in the battle against Florida's lionfish invasion is the Antipodes, a five-person manned submersible operated by OceanGate, Inc.
Credit OceanGate, Inc.

A team of scientists from  around the country recently spent two days off the coast of South Florida to investigate the explosion of lionfish.

What they found was shocking. Why?

Because there’s a war going on and the indomitable lionfish are winning.

These voracious predators are known to invade the shallows of coral reef.  They’re dangerous because they ruin the habitat and eat juvenile spiny lobsters, snappers, groupers, tarpon and bonefish - all valuable marine species humans rely on.

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Climate Change
6:00 am
Fri June 28, 2013

Why Handwringing About Sea Level Rise Won't Save Miami

Credit FL Center for Environmental Studies

Miami as the modern Atlantis has a strangely tragic and romantic appeal.

Officially founded in 1896 (though there were settlers for some 75 years before that), and if a Rolling Stone article due to hit newsstands on July 4 is correct, Miami and the rest of coastal South Florida is looking at a very succinct timeline of existence.

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Agriculture
8:05 am
Thu June 27, 2013

New Bugs In Florida Stymie Researchers, Threaten Crops

The psyllid, discovered eight years ago in Florida citrus groves, has been problematic for researchers and farmers alike.
University of California, Davis AP

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 5:34 am

With its pleasant climate, Florida has become home to more exotic and invasive species of plants and animals than any other state in the continental U.S. Some invasive species have been brought in deliberately, such as the Burmese python or the Cuban brown snail. But the majority of species are imported inadvertently as cargo.

Amanda Hodges, who heads the biosecurity research lab at the University of Florida, says that until recently, scientists saw about a dozen new bugs arrive in Florida each year.

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Environment
12:02 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

Where Are The Most Deaths From Lightning? Florida

Originally published on Tue June 25, 2013 10:50 am

Florida ranks number one in the country in lightning strikes per square mile. So, it should be no surprise that Florida leads in lightning deaths as well.

But what’s eye opening to John Jensenius, a lightning specialist with the National Weather Service, is that 82 percent of the lightning deaths are male.

Also surprising is what they were doing when hit by lightning.

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Climate Change
10:14 am
Tue June 25, 2013

Obama Lays Out Broad Plan To Address Climate Change

The Capitol dome is seen behind the Capitol Power Plant, which provides power to buildings in the Capitol complex in Washington, D.C.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Tue June 25, 2013 2:45 pm

Update at 2:38 p.m. ET. Obama Lays Out Plan:

In an address at Georgetown University in Washington, President Obama laid out a sweeping new plan to address climate change.

As expected, Obama said his plan seeks to cap the carbon emissions of power plants.

Obama also said the Keystone XL pipeline, which would carry oil from Canada to Texas, would only be approved by the State Department if it aligned with the "nation's interest."

That is if "this project does not significantly exacerbate the problem of carbon pollution," Obama said.

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Climate Change
7:47 am
Mon June 24, 2013

Coastal Cities Prepare For The Rising Tide

Originally published on Sun June 23, 2013 5:02 pm

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Jacki Lyden.

Today on the show, 50 years on from Martin Luther King's "I Have a Dream" speech and music from the front lines of Brazil. But first, in a major policy address on Tuesday, President Barack Obama will outline his administration's plan to curb our historic levels of carbon emissions. A video released yesterday outlined some of what to expect.

(SOUNDBITE OF VIDEO)

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Environment
6:00 pm
Fri June 21, 2013

What To Expect During This Weekend's Supermoon, King Tide

SUPERMOON Photographer John Spade got this shot of the last supermoon on May 5, 2012. It shines on an Atlantic Ocean pier north of Fort Lauderdale.
Credit John Spade/Flickr

The sun, the Earth and the moon will align this weekend to leave a supermoon shining on a king tide.

But it’s all a little less spectacular than it sounds. At least, now it is. A few years down the road -- if the climate change people are right -- the king tide may be something to dread. But, right now, it’s just an incremental enhancement of an ordinary event.

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Environment
7:38 am
Thu June 20, 2013

How Igor The Amazonian Pacu Fish Found A Place Called Home

Igor the Pacu fish has two sets of pectoral fins and a deformed face but he is still a favorite for many visitors at the Loxahatchee River Center in Jupiter.
Credit Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission

In the piranha- infested waters of the Amazon, a baby Black Pacu, the vegetarian cousin of the flesh-eating fish survives capture.  If it had nine lives, its next one was in a tropical aquarium in a Boca Raton seafood restaurant.

Weighing nearly one pound, the non-native Pacu was growing too big, too fast. Once again, the fish needed another home. The restaurant, The Ports of Call, was dismantling their aquariums so the Pacu was returned to its original owner.

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Forensics
8:54 am
Wed June 19, 2013

Animal CSI: Inside The Smithsonian's Feather Forensics Lab

The ornithologist works through the feathers of the stuffed birds to find one that matches her sample.
Marie McGrory NPR

Originally published on Wed June 19, 2013 9:40 am

Carla Dove smiles as she tears open a small, flat cardboard box. She is sitting at a lab bench in her office at the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History.

"It's kind of like Christmas for me because I never know what's going to be in the packages," she says.

Inside the box are a bunch of sealed sandwich-size bags. Dove counts the bags.

"Eight samples today," she notes. Each sample consists of grayish pieces of feathers, and sometimes bones, all from inside the stomachs and intestines of Burmese pythons.

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Environment
7:00 am
Wed June 12, 2013

The Not So Quiet Rebellion Against Florida's State Bird

The roseate spoonbill is often mistaken as flamingo.
Credit Beautiful Lily/Flickr

Birding blogger Nicolas Lund recently argued in an article for Slate magazine that Florida should change its state bird to the Flamingo.

He was actually advocating for several states to change their birds, but he seemed particularly peeved with Florida’s current choice:

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Topical Currents
1:00 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Comprehensive Governmental Protections For Consumers, Workers, and the Environment

Freedom to Harm
yalepress.yale.edu

06/11/13 - Tuesday's Topical Currents looks at federal regulatory and state civil justice systems with University of Texas Administrative Law professor Thomas McGarity. He’s written FREEDOM TO HARM:  The Lasting Legacy of the Laissez Faire RevivalMcGarity contends there’s been a return to the political economy which dominated the American Gilded Age Society. He points to weakened environmental laws and looser bank safety policies. That’s Topical Currents at 1pm on WLRN-HD1 rebroadcast at 7pm on WLRN-HD2 and audio on-demand after the live program.  
Environment
10:35 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Everglades Restoration: Water And Money Flow Into The River Of Grass

Everglades restoration received a sizable cash infusion this week.
Credit Balthazira / Flickr Creative Commons

May was an eventful -- and most would likely say hopeful -- month for the beleaguered Everglades. Gov. Rick Scott signed into law new legislation that will provide hundreds of millions of dollars over the next decade to fund Everglades restoration and cleanup.

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