environment

Palm Beach County Farmers Want To Sell Land To Developers

Feb 18, 2015
Palm Beach County

Palm Beach County held its second roundtable Tuesday, discussing development options for the county’s Agricultural Reserve -- a 22,000-acre piece of land west of Boynton Beach and Delray Beach, just between Florida’s Turnpike and the Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge. Farmers want to sell their land to developers because business is bad.

Today on WLRN-Miami Herald News, you heard:

Matt Ortega /Flickr

Budgets are said to embody values, and President Barack Obama’s budget surely shows his legislative values. The $3.9 trillion budget would levy new taxes on the wealthiest Americans to pay for things to help low and middle income families, like free community college.

That’s not sitting well with Republicans in the region. South Florida Congressman Carlos Curbelo says it’s a political document.

Emma_L_M/flickr

More than 4 million voters approved Amendment 1 in the November 2014 election. The measure received an overwhelming 75 percent "yes" vote.

That vote unleashed hundred of millions of dollars this year and billions of dollars over the next 20 years that have to be spent on acquiring and improving Florida lands. The amendment uses fewer than 150 words to describe the types of projects the money has to be spent on. That section is highlighted in blue below.

    

Jessica Meszaros / WLRN

For more than 20 years, Palm Beach County has worked to improve Lake Worth Lagoon -- a 20-mile body of water stretching from North Palm Beach to Boynton Beach. It’s the county’s largest estuary and also infamous for its polluted past.

The county hosted its third lagoon boat tour in late January to showcase several projects improving the lagoon and helping the county’s ecotourism.

WUSF is following the Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition as they bike, hike and kayak from Central Florida through the Panhandle to the Alabama state line. The three conservationists recently paddled down the Withlacoochee River from the Green Swamp to the Gulf Coast. We  tagged along with them for a trip back to primeval Florida - paddling down one of the state's most pristine springs.

 

Joe Rimkus Jr. / Miami Herald Staff

It's not a canary or a coal mine in Florida, but the idea from Audubon of Florida is the same. Wading birds hold the same function as the canary, and in this case the coal mine is the Everglades. Tabitha Cale with the society says things are dire.

Jessica Meszaros / WLRN

Governor Rick Scott spoke to reporters with a caged Florida panther present Tuesday at Gator Park in Miami. He announced that $150 million will go toward Everglades restoration this year and $5 billion throughout the next 20 years. Part of the plan he announced funds projects to protect panthers-- 2014 was a bad year for panther deaths. The other part is to move, clean and store Florida’s water supply.

Amber Ernst-Leonard / Florida Keys Community College

Florida Keys Community College, the state’s southernmost institution of higher education, has recently formed a new partnership with Mote Marine Laboratory. Mote is headquartered in Sarasota and has six facilities throughout the state, including one on Summerland Key.

Mote scientists will teach courses at the college, and FKCC students will apprentice at the marine lab, giving them real world experience.

Quinn Dombrowski / Flickr

Recently, the Knight Foundation released the finalists for its first Knight Cities Challenge.

 

The foundation was looking for proposals to make more than two dozen communities around the country better places to live and work, and 10 of the 126 finalists come from Miami.

Tiffany Noé is one of those finalists. She owns a small urban farm in Miami called the Little River Cooperative.

Her idea is to provide the public with free fruit trees.

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