energy

FPL

The demand for electricity is growing in South Florida, but Florida Power and Light has been tearing down power plants.

The power plants like the one in the slideshow above have been generating electricity for more than 50 years in many cases. Often, they burned oil to make power.

RELATED: The Sunshine Economy: Energy

Tom Hudson

The sound of turning over the pistons in an internal combustion engine are familiar to just about everyone. The almost soothing feeling of that low rumble of a well-tuned engine in idle.

RELATED: The Sunshine Economy: Energy

Linda Gassenheimer doesn't have these sounds or feelings anymore. And she doesn't miss them.

That's Linda on the right, in the driver's seat of her all-electric car.

And it's like her; petite but with a certain pizzazz.

Tom Hudson

We are burning less gasoline. That may sound strange but Floridians have less of a thirst for gas.

Some of the drop can be blamed on the slower economy since the Great Recession, but also we are driving more fuel efficient cars and trucks. Except for a three-year period (2004-2006) the volume of gasoline Florida drivers are buying has fallen from its high in 2002.

RELATED: The Sunshine Economy: Energy

FPL Proposes 600 Miles Of Natural Gas Pipelines

Aug 13, 2013
fpl.com

Hundreds of miles of proposed pipeline may begin pumping natural gas between Southwest Alabama and Martin County, Florida within four years if Florida Power and Light (FPL) gets the okay from state regulators.

A decade ago FPL burned more oil to make electricity than any other electric utility in the United States.

But this year it expects to burn 99 percent less crude oil.

RELATED: The Sunshine Economy: Energy

Much of the difference has been made up by natural gas, with some of the new power coming from nuclear energy.

Tom Hudson

Flip a light switch, turn the ignition key or hit the start button.  These are actions most of us do several times each day without thinking about where the power is coming from. Florida may have plenty of sunshine but it doesn't have any substantial supply of fossil fuels.  And fossil fuels still power much of our lives.

Marsha Halper / Miami Herald Staff

Five years and more than $650 million into refurbishing and building nuclear reactors, Florida Power & Light officials told regulators Monday that it can’t guarantee what new reactors will cost consumers, when the reactors will deliver energy, or even if it will get a license to finish the job.

Despite the uncertainty, the state’s largest electric company asked regulators to allow it to continue to charge customers to pay for the prospective expansion of the Turkey Point plant on Biscayne Bay in south Miami-Dade County.

Duke Energy Customers To Pay More As Nuke Plans Scrapped

Aug 6, 2013
Flaglerlive.com

Florida customers of Duke Energy should expect to pay more next year for nuclear projects, even as the company reduces its planned nuclear footprint.

Meanwhile, Florida Power & Light, which has recently completed upgrades of two nuclear facilities, will lower the amount it collects for nuclear projects. For a homeowner who uses 1,000 kilowatt hours of power a month, that will save $1.17.

At 6:46 a.m. this morning, the FPL Port Everglades Power Plant vanished from the I-595 skyline, demolished to make way for an energy efficient future. 

But, while this demolition only lasted a mere minute, it required months of preparation and a professional demolition team, who called the demolition “a controlled implosion.”

New Florida Law Challenges Federal Ethanol Standards

Jul 8, 2013
Rama/ Creative Commons

On July 1, close to 200 new Florida laws went into effect, one of which is a direct challenge to Federal fuel regulations.

And one unexpected beneficiary is the recreational boat user.

Florida struck down the following part of its Renewable Fuel Standard Act:

“Each terminal supplier, importer, blender, and wholesaler shall also include in the report to the department the number of gallons of blended and unblended gasoline.”

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