endangered species

Environment
6:24 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

Manatees Might Lose Endangered Status

Credit U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Southeast Region / Creative Commons/Flickr

Manatees have been an endangered species since 1967. But on Tuesday, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service made an announcement that this classification may soon be lowered to "threatened."

But some environmentalists and government officials are opposed to this change. They say changing the label might result in more lenient rules about boat speed zones and dock-building limits. 

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Environment
6:31 am
Mon June 10, 2013

A Florida Scrub Jay 'Rebound' In Palm Beach County? Don't Get Your Hopes Up

An unbanded Florida scrub jay recently spotted in Jupiter Ridge Natural Area.
Credit Sabrina Olson Carle / WLRN

The future remains uncertain for the struggling Florida scrub jay, an endemic state species that is increasingly difficult -- but not impossible -- to find in Palm Beach County. Statewide efforts to study and document the birds' population and habitat use may help to turn the tide for this gregarious bird.

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Environment
7:03 am
Thu May 16, 2013

Feds Do About-Face, Step In To Help Endangered Florida Grasshopper Sparrow

The clock is ticking for the Florida grasshopper sparrow.
Credit MyFWC.com / Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission

The clock is ticking for the highly-endangered Florida grasshopper sparrow, but a new project recently green-lit by a federal agency may offer some hope for avoiding extinction. Scientists believe there are roughly 200 of the tiny birds remaining in the wild. Two years ago, scientists found the lowest count of the birds in history: last year's numbers dipped even lower. 

      

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Environment
2:16 pm
Tue May 14, 2013

Why The 'World's Weirdest Bird' Is Ditching South Florida And Heading North

Roseate spoonbills are increasingly ditching South Florida for points north.
Credit Patdaversa / Flickr Creative Commons

The roseate spoonbill -- often mistaken by confused tourists for the non-native flamingo -- is one of Florida's great iconic species. Dubbed "one of the most breathtaking of the world's weirdest birds" by naturalist Roger Tory Peterson, the gangly creatures are an increasingly rare sight in South Florida. 

According to a feature in the May-June issue of Audubon Magazine, spoonbills have been vacating South Florida in droves, heading north to more hospitable (read: often less developed) lands.

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Florida Panther Released in PBC
8:01 am
Fri April 5, 2013

Florida Panther Released In Palm Beach County: VIDEO

A Florida panther is released April 3 into Rotenberger Wildlife Management Area in Palm Beach County.
Credit Tim Donovan/MyFWCmedia / Flickr

Florida wildlife news often is dominated by loss: record numbers of manatee deaths, an endangered species on the brink of extinction, invasives over-taking entire ecosystems and so on.

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Science
7:01 am
Mon March 18, 2013

Red Tide Claims 170 Manatees, But South Florida Population Should Be Spared

Manatees that winter in Southeast Florida are unlikely to be impacted by the red tide blooms killing dozens of manatees on the Southwest side of the state.
Credit Tricia Woolfenden

One of Florida's most beloved endangered species is facing a tough end to the winter. State wildlife officials have confirmed the deaths of more than 170 manatees in Southwest Florida as red tide impacts regional populations of the gentle water-dwelling mammals.

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Florida Grasshopper Sparrow
10:00 am
Wed February 13, 2013

Biologists Ask: Why Won't The Feds Fund Protection Of Florida's Nearly Extinct Grasshopper Sparrow?

The Florida grasshopper sparrow is facing extinction.
Credit MyFWC.com / Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission

One of Florida's endemic species, the Florida grasshopper sparrow, is on the path to extinction. The bird lives only in the dry prairies south of Orlando and it's believed that less than 200 of the highly-specialized sparrows remain in the wild, though funding doesn't exist to adequately track the population. Part of the problem has been drumming up the public support -- and money -- necessary to study what has happened to the subspecies.   

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