education

What's In A Name? Not 'Community' College

Jan 3, 2018
Nancy Klingener / WLRN

Florida “community colleges” would continue to be a vanishing breed under a proposal that will be considered during the legislative session that starts next week.

Meredith Geddings / Florida House of Representatives

First, it was "Bright Futures." Next, it could be "Sunshine."

State Rep. Shevrin Jones, a Broward County Democrat, is pushing to establish a new taxpayer-funded grant that would help low-income Floridians earn certificates and associate's degrees. 

On the NPR Ed Team, I am what you might call the grizzled veteran. I've seen education trends come and go and come again. And go again.

You get the idea.

In years past, around December, my teammates would often pause by my desk and ask: "What do you think we'll be covering next year?"

I've always found this a fun thought exercise, and, at some point, my editor suggested I jot down my answers and share them beyond our cubicles. And so, here are a few predictions for 2018.

Lindsey Kilbride / WMFE

Using cutting-edge video game technology and animation, the U.S. Army and Homeland Security Department have developed a computer-based simulator that can train everyone from teachers to first responders on how to react to an active shooter scenario.

 

The training center is housed at the University of Central Florida in Orlando and offers numerous role-playing opportunities that can be used to train anyone in the world with a computer.

 

Winter break is when many high school seniors are rushing to finish their college applications. Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson gets some tips from Lisa Micele (@LisaMicele), director of college counseling at the University of Illinois Laboratory High School in Urbana, Illinois.

10 ‘Micele Musts’ For College Applications And Using Your Winter Break

The Florida Supreme Court on Tuesday declined to wade in on the state’s controversial new education law.

The case has now been transferred to the Leon County Circuit Court instead.

Judge Refuses To Dismiss Education Law Challenge

Dec 19, 2017
Miami Herald

A circuit judge has rejected the state's request to dismiss a lawsuit filed by the Palm Beach County School Board that challenges a controversial new education law.

After holding a hearing in the case, Leon County Circuit Judge James Shelfer issued a two-paragraph order late Monday afternoon denying the state's motion for dismissal.

Graduate students nationwide can breathe a sigh of relief: Their tuition waivers won't be taxed after all.

A provision in the Republican House tax plan had originally proposed taxing grad students' tuition waivers as income. It was a controversial proposal and sent a wave of anxiety across campuses, leading to protests at dozens of universities.

A Florida appeals court on Wednesday shot down a lawsuit over public school funding, saying it raises "political questions" that cannot be answered by judges.

A new law allows any Florida resident to question what's being taught in the state's public schools.

A handful of complaints have been filed in school districts across the state since the law took effect in July. Previously, challenges to curriculum and instructional material could only be made by parents.

Property Tax Money Could Be Key In Education Budget

Dec 8, 2017

Education Commissioner Pam Stewart told a Senate budget panel Thursday that funding would be “woefully short” next year if lawmakers do not use an increase in property tax collections to support schools.

Odalis Garcia / WLRN

Around 200 Puerto Rican students and their families toured Florida International University (FIU) on Wednesday to see if the school is a good fit for them to catch up with their studies and enroll in the spring semester.

Nadege Green / WLRN

Sister Margaret Ann greets her students as they’re dropped off to school in the morning.

She helps open car doors, gushes over a student’s cute dog and warns a group heading to the Everglades on a field trip to be on their best behavior because alligators are nothing to play with.

A proposal prohibiting local school board members from being paid looks unlikely to go before Florida voters. But term limits for those members and making superintendents appointed instead of elected are moving ahead.

Gov. Rick Scott stopped at a Tampa elementary school Monday morning, touting what he called a record budget for education. Scott may not get what he wants from lawmakers, but he vowed to push forward, anyway.

Pages