education

Wilson Sayre / WLRN News

As Hurricane Irma bore down on South Florida, Kevin Youngman and his family sought shelter at Falcon Cove Middle School in Weston. There, he found himself in enemy territory.

“I think it’s weird for us because we all went to the rival middle school, Tequesta Trace,” said Youngman, 25, as he relaxed on an air mattress in the school gym.

Palm Beach County may have dodged the worst of Hurricane Irma’s winds, but the storm dealt a direct hit to classrooms.

After seven days of canceled classes, the county’s public school system is weighing whether it needs to resort to makeup days to recoup lost classroom time when classes resume Monday.

No decision has been made, but Schools Superintendent Robert Avossa said he was worried about the effect of missed days on students.

“Every missed hour is a missed opportunity to grow and learn,” Avossa said.

mcd.edu

After being out of class for more than a week, some South Florida public schools are getting ready to swing back open the doors.

Broward County Public Schools Superintendent Robert Runcie said on Saturday all teachers and students must go back to school on Monday, Sept. 18. Students in Palm Beach Schools will also resume Monday.

Miami-Dade Public Schools officials said they would make a decision late Saturday or early Sunday about reopening. 

Lannis Waters / The Palm Beach Post

More than two dozen Palm Beach County public schools will be offering free meals to children and their families on Thursday and Friday to ensure access to nutritious meals as schools work to reopen after Hurricane Irma.

The 27 campuses will serve breakfast and lunch to anyone under 18, along with their adult caretakers, the school district said. Breakfasts will be served from 7:30 to 9 a.m. and lunch will be served from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Credit John O'Connor / StateImpact Florida

Education has traditionally been a mainstay topic for labor activists. So it seems appropriate that going into Labor Day this year, some South Florida educators are trying to unionize.

In recent years, colleges and universities, hoping to cut costs, have increasingly relied on part-time professors. In response, a growing number of part-time professors are pushing for unions. They're seeking things like higher wages and health-care benefits.

The University of Tampa on Aug. 29 fired a visiting professor who tweeted that Texas was experiencing “instant karma” from the destruction of Hurricane Harvey because the state voted for Republicans.

“I don't believe in instant karma but this kinda feels like it for Texas,” Kenneth Storey, an assistant professor of sociology, tweeted. “Hopefully this will help them realize the GOP doesn't care about them.”

Roberto Koltun / Miami Herald

With the future of a program that protects undocumented young people from deportation in question, leaders of Miami-Dade lined up Wednesday to voice their support for “Dreamers” and reassure scared kids that the community has their back.

Florida New Majority

As Miami-Dade County prepares for public input on its budget, a local non-profit is teaching residents how to advocate for the causes they care about.

Going through Miami-Dade’s $7 billion budget can be a daunting task for the average citizen. 

That is why Florida New Majority says it created a series of workshops to teach the public how to find information in the voluminous budget document.

United States Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos visited Leon County Tuesday, making stops at Holy Comforter Episcopal School and the Florida State University Research School. DeVos used the trip to champion school choice and individual liberties.

University of Tampa Professor Fired Over Hurricane Tweet

Aug 30, 2017

The University of Tampa on Tuesday fired a visiting professor who tweeted that Texas was experiencing “instant karma” from the destruction of Hurricane Harvey because the state voted for Republicans.

Brandon McElveen's Ford F150 pickup is lifted up about six inches. He says that's just the style in the South, but this week, "it's come in handy" for driving through up to four feet of water.

McElveen's a counselor at the KIPP Explore Academy elementary school in Houston. Within hours of the flooding this week, he began getting calls and messages asking for help. One was from a family with two girls on the middle school softball team he also coaches.

With his truck and a borrowed kayak, he estimates he's helped more than 20 people to safety.

The start of the school year can be rough on some kids. It's a big shift from summer's freedom and lack of structure to the measured routines of school. And sometimes that can build up into tears, losing sleep, outbursts and other classic signs of anxiety.

"Going back to school is a transition for everyone," says Lynn Bufka, a practicing psychologist who also works at the American Psychological Association. "No matter the age of the child, or if they've been to school before."

On Friday night, Fabrice Charles is planning to go to bed early so he can get a good night's sleep. He's got a big day on Saturday, when he'll join hundreds of thousands of other students taking the new summer SAT.

"I get stressed really easily," he says, "so I've just got to relax and think back to my exercises."

For the first time since the 1970s, the College Board is offering an August SAT testing date and the rising high school senior in Boston says he's ready.

Joel Ryan / AP

The first day of school can be traumatic. Reluctant high schoolers schlep unopened summer reading books aboard early morning buses. Kindergartners sob at being separated from their parents -- and vice-versa.

It was the year 2000 and Maine's governor at the time, Angus King, was excited about the Internet. The World Wide Web was still relatively young but King wanted every student in the state to have access to it.

"Go into history class and the teacher says, 'Open your computer. We're going to go to rome.com and we're going to watch an archaeologist explore the Catacombs this morning in real time.' What a learning tool that is!"

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