education

News
5:46 pm
Wed December 12, 2012

NEWSCAST: Meet Florida's New Education Chief

Dr. Tony Bennett speaking in Indiana.
Credit The Mattie C. Stewart Foundation

Indiana Superintendent Tony Bennett will be Florida's next education commissioner. The Florida Board of Education unanimously selected Bennett, a protege of former Gov. Jeb Bush. As Indiana's chief, Tony Bennett imported Florida education ideas to the Hoosier state. Board of education members cite Bennett's familiarity with new Common Core standards as Florida transforms how schools teach and test students. Bennett says he wants Florida to remain a national education reform     leader. "I think we have a great opportunity to capture Florida's moment," Bennett says.

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Florida Education Commissioner
12:49 pm
Wed December 12, 2012

'Rock Star' Educator Who Follows Jeb Bush Picked For Florida Education Commissioner

NEW EDUCATION CHIEF: Tony Bennett of Indiana was the unanimous choice to become Florida's next education commissioner.

Florida has chosen a follower of Jeb Bush education theory from Indiana to be its next education commissioner.

Tony Bennett is serving out his term as Indiana's superintendent of public instruction after a re-election defeat.  In Florida, he'll replace Gerard Robinson, who resigned months ago after only a year in office.

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News Education
6:02 pm
Mon December 3, 2012

NEWSCAST: Former Indiana Education Chief Applies Here

Former Indiana Education Chief Tony Bennett.
Credit eric.bradner

  

  Indiana's ousted education chief says he's applied for the Sunshine State's top schools job.

Tony Bennett lost his bid for reelection last month.

Bennett says he first met Jeb Bush after winning election as the Indiana's Superintendent of Public Instruction four years ago.

Since then, Bennett has taken education policies Bush first in Florida tried and brought them to Indiana. Those ideas are often called "The Florida Model."

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Jeb Bush
12:46 pm
Tue November 27, 2012

Experts Are Taking Another Look At Jeb Bush's Education Cred

Experts say that Jeb Bush's education gains in Florida deserve stricter scrutiny.
Credit World Affairs Council of Philadelphia/Flickr

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush has been riding a wave of popularity in the last few years. Members of the Republican Party have been clamoring for him to seek higher office as he travels around the country taking on some of the more extreme positions recently taken by members of his party.

Among his credentials, which are currently prompting all the focus, is his popularity with the Latino community and his credentials as a successful education policy innovator.

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Higher Ed
12:30 pm
Mon November 26, 2012

Why Rick Scott's $10k Challenge For Colleges Might Be A Gamble

Scott is challenging colleges to find a bachelor's degree program that costs $10,000 or less.
Credit JaxStrong /Flickr

Gov. Rick Scott issued a challenge to colleges all over the state asking them to find a way to offer a bachelor's degree program that costs no more than $10,000 for all four years.

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Building Green
1:00 pm
Fri November 23, 2012

Old Boynton Beach School Hopes 'Green' Design Wins Gold Star

Green Transformation: Sun and wind will power one of Palm Beach County's oldest schools.
Credit edline.net

One of Palm Beach County's oldest public schools is hoping to become one of Florida's greenest.

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Foreign Students
9:47 am
Mon November 12, 2012

The Top 5 Countries Florida's International College Students Come From

Florida ranks seventh in the country for the number of foreign college students.
Credit KAETIDH / FLICKR

 

Saudi Arabia and South Korea are among the top 5 leading places of origin for international college and university students in Florida.

That's according to the Institute for International Education, which released its Open Doors fact sheet today.

It reports that during the 2011-12 school year, 32,567 students from other countries enrolled for the first time in a Florida college or university. 

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News
6:22 pm
Wed November 7, 2012

NEWSCAST: Miami-Dade Waits; Results For Schools 'Great.'

Cones Mark The Spot.
Credit Pamela

Just what led to some voting breakdowns in Miami-Dade is still up for debate - not enough resources, too many voters, too long a ballot, too many precincts in one place. About the only thing certain is it will be at least one more day before we know who can claim Florida.One man who is happy with the election results and is Miami-Dade School Superintendent Alberto Carvalho. Voters overwhelmingly approved the $1.2 billion dollar bond referendum to refurbish aging school buildings and also update and install new technology. 

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Paying For College
1:00 pm
Mon November 5, 2012

How Tuition Menu Could Lure Florida Students Into Math/Tech Careers

Tuition Idea: Should dancers pay more than engineers for their degrees?

Under a higher education plan now developing in Florida, you’d pay a lot more for a standard liberal arts degree than for one in science or the technologies.

It's Gov. Rick Scott's way of encouraging people to study for high-demand, economy-building careers.

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Politics
6:14 pm
Fri October 19, 2012

How Most College Students Would Prefer To Vote

Flickr/DonkeyHotey

Forget booths and absentee ballots.

College students would rather vote using their thumbs, according to a study conducted by telecommunications giant AT&T.

AT&T conducted the survey on one of the most politically galvanized campuses in the nation -- Lynn University in Boca Raton.  American politics have played a major role at Lynn since last fall, when the university was chosen to host the last Presidential debate of 2012.

Out of nearly 300 students surveyed, 58 percent say they would use smartphones to cast their ballot if "mobile voting" were available.

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Politics
2:39 pm
Fri October 19, 2012

Gov. Scott On Race-Based Scoring: ‘We Should Have High Standards For Everybody'

The State Board of Education strategic plan utilizes race-based scoring to help close the achievement gap.
Jamesnaruke/flickr

Gov. Rick Scott wants the State Board of Education to change its plan to set passing scores based on a student’s race. But he isn’t saying what the board should do to alter the plan.

Every child should be performing on grade level in subjects like math and reading, Scott says. “I mean, I learn differently than other people learn, but I do know that all children can learn,” Scott says, “and we should expect we should have high standards for everybody.”

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Politics
6:15 pm
Wed October 17, 2012

Analyst: Rick Scott Begins Unofficial Reelection Bid With Focus On Teachers

Governor Scott hears from teachers at Southwest Miami High.
FLGOVSCOTT/Flickr

Gov. Rick Scott is trying to appease educators.

They didn’t like it when he chopped $1.3 billion in education funding from the state budget.

They liked it even less when he called for an expansion of charter schools and other alternatives to traditional public schools.

So, while most people are focused on the November ballot, USF Political Scientist Seth McKee says Scott appears to be ramping up his 2014 reelection campaign by extending an olive branch to teachers.

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Education
4:07 pm
Tue October 16, 2012

How WLRN Talked Education With 17 Million People

Sarah Gon­za­lez of WLRN's StateIm­pact Florida, Michel Mar­tin of NPR's Tell Me More and John O’Connor, also of StateIm­pact Florida, at the Octo­ber 10 Twit­ter Edu­ca­tion Forum at WLRN studios in downtown Miami.
Tell Me More

Last week’s Twit­ter Edu­ca­tion Forum, hosted last week in col­lab­o­ra­tion with Tell Me More was a huge success. Not only did it pro­vide a plat­form for a dynamic and diverse con­ver­sa­tion about edu­ca­tion reform in the US (and one that we plan to con­tinue), but it also reached a whop­ping 17 mil­lion peo­ple–and count­ing. (That’s right. They’re stilll Tweet­ing. They just can’t stop!)

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Dozier School For Boys
6:30 am
Tue October 16, 2012

Florida's Dozier School For Boys: A True Horror Story

Dick Colon, one of the White House Boys, walks through grave sites near the Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla. Several men who suffered abuse and severe beatings believe the crosses mark the graves of boys who were killed at the school, victims of punishments that went too far.
Phil Coale AP

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 6:47 pm

Over the past decade, hundreds of men have come forward to tell gruesome stories of abuse and terrible beatings they suffered at Florida's Dozier School for Boys, a notorious, state-run institution that closed last year after more than a century.

Known as the "White House Boys," these 300-some men were sent as boys to the reform school in the small panhandle town of Mariana in the 1950s and 1960s. They have joined together over the years to tell their stories of the violence administered in a small building on the school's grounds they knew as the White House.

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Young Caregivers
4:24 pm
Fri October 12, 2012

WATCH: Youth Caregivers Fight To Finish School

YouTube Screenshot

Seventeen-year-old Jimmy Braat has three passions in life: playing music, photography, and being a caregiver to his grandma.

"It's all I'm good at!" he laughs. He started taking care of his great grandmother at age 9.

"My mom was always at work so it was kind of my role I guess," Jimmy says," She passed away at 92 when I was 13. So now, I take care of my grandmother."

Jimmy is three years behind in school and now participates in an online school program called hospital homebound.

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