education

Journalism
7:00 am
Tue June 18, 2013

Why This $350 Million Online Language School Moved To Miami

Open English is an online language school that has taught English to 100,000 students in more than 40 countries since 2006.

When Andrés Moreno, the chief executive officer of Open English gets off the plane in Bogotá, São Paolo, Caracas or pretty much any other major Latin American city, people who recognize him from the company’s TV ads stop to ask for photos and autographs.

So why, with all this notoriety, did the CEO of a $350 million dollar company that specializes in teaching English online to Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking students move the company’s main office from Latin America to Miami three years ago?

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Digital Classrooms
7:00 am
Mon June 17, 2013

What We Mean When We Talk About The Digital Divide In Florida

Students at Park Vista Community High School refurbish computers for donation.
Credit Sammy Mack / StateImpact Florida

It’s finals week at Park Vista Community High School and a small group of students buzzes over an assembly line of used Dell computers that lie cracked open with all their electronic guts exposed.

Many of the donated computers that Stabio refurbishes in class will be given to families who don’t have computers at home. It’s part of a Palm Beach County program aimed at closing the digital divide.

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Analysis
11:58 am
Wed June 12, 2013

Florida Test Gains Among Nation's Best Since 2003

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 12:27 pm

Florida students had some of the nation’s largest gains between 2003 and 2011 on a key national standardized test, according to a new analysis by Education Sector, a nonpartisan policy research group.

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Diversity
6:30 am
Tue June 4, 2013

Se Habla Espanol? Pioneering Bilingual Ed At Miami's Coral Way Elementary

A first-grade, Spanish-language reading class at Coral Way Elementary in 1964. A thermometer on the wall shows that it was cold on that winter day.
Credit University of Arizona's Coral Way Bilingual Elementary Program Oral History Project

The first English/Spanish bilingual education program in the country started at Miami's Coral Way Elementary in 1963. It was supposed to be a temporary curriculum to help Cuban students retain their language and culture, while people waited for the Castro regime to fall. 

Today the school, which has since expanded to the eighth grade, continues to thrive. Coral Way's elementary students spend about 60% of the day learning in English and 40% learning in Spanish.

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Jobs
7:14 am
Mon June 3, 2013

If Employment Game Has Changed, Who's Teaching The Rules?

Students aren't getting the advice they need to be successful, according to Anthony Carnevale, director of Georgetown's Center on Education and the Workforce.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun June 2, 2013 1:31 pm

It still pays to earn a college degree. That is, if you get the right one. Georgetown University published a report Wednesday that looked into this dilemma.

"The labor market demands more specialization. So, the game has changed," says Anthony Carnevale, the report's co-author and director of Georgetown's Center on Education and the Workforce.

Carnevale says students probably aren't choosing the right degrees because they haven't been given the right guidance.

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The Florida Roundup
12:00 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

This Week's Florida Roundup: Hurricanes, Texting And Driving, And Education Policy

Texting while driving is soon to be illegal in Florida. But does the new law actually have enough teeth to make a difference? What about those red light cameras? An update on the way we drive.

Key decisions are made in next month’s trial of George Zimmerman, who stands accused of murdering Trayvon Martin. What will jurors know about the Miami Gardens teenager’s background? What won’t they hear in the trial everyone will be watching in Sanford starting next month.

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Community Contributor
6:30 am
Thu May 30, 2013

Teachers May Sometimes Feel Like Sisyphus, But Pushing That Boulder Has Its Benefits

Neyda Borges was selected the Region I Teacher of the Year in 2011.

What have I learned this school year?

I've learned that teaching is hard. Not only because of the curriculum, not only because of the new tests, new rules, new measures. Not only because there are tests, tests, and more tests. But because it so often feels like an insurmountable, thankless, stressful endeavor.

The rules are always changing. The tests are always changing. And the blame for anything and everything that goes wrong usually falls squarely on our shoulders.

But teaching is also so rewarding.

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Education Policy
11:18 am
Fri May 24, 2013

What Did You Learn In School This Year? Tell Us Your Story

What did you learn in school this year? Tell us!
Credit photostock / freedigitalphotos.net

It was a big year for education policy in Florida.

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Florida Budget
3:30 pm
Thu May 23, 2013

Florida's Education Budget By The Numbers

Originally published on Tue May 21, 2013 10:02 am

Gov. Rick Scott has signed a budget that’s very different than the one he’s been paying for since he authorized massive education cuts two years ago.

Back then, pundits speculated Scott may have sealed his fate as a one term governor when he proposed a few billion dollars worth of cuts to education. Scott, for his part, seemed surprised by the widespread backlash.

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Education
9:54 am
Mon May 13, 2013

Documents Show K12 Struggling With Teacher Quality

Originally published on Sun May 12, 2013 12:01 am

The Florida Center for Investigative Reporting and StateImpact Florida have obtained internal emails and a recording of a company meeting that provide new insight into allegations that K12 Inc., the nation’s largest online education company, uses teachers in Florida who do not have all of the required state certifications.

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Politics
6:48 pm
Thu May 2, 2013

Jeb Bush Is Sticking To His Guns On Parent Trigger Bill

Originally published on Thu May 2, 2013 12:47 pm

The Foundation for Florida’s Future isn’t giving up on the parent trigger bill. They’re asking people to announce their support on Twitter and other social media with ready-made post to cut and paste.

The bill — officially titled Parent Empowerment in Education — would give parents more power in choosing how to change a chronically failing school.

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Florida Legislature
3:40 pm
Wed May 1, 2013

Teachers May Receive Raises Sooner Than June 2014

Originally published on Wed May 1, 2013 11:04 am

Teachers might not have to wait another year for a raise after all.

Leaders in the Florida Legislature are working on a fix to the education budget that provides $480 million in raises for teachers and other school personnel.

But according to the budget, that money won’t be in paychecks until June 2014.

Lawmakers say a technical fix should get teachers their raises before next year.

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Politics
10:43 am
Mon April 29, 2013

Lawmakers, Gov. Scott Compromise On Teacher Raises

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 9:52 am

Lawmakers and Gov. Rick Scott reached a compromise on $480 million in raises for teachers and other school workers.

The raises are part of a $74 billion spending plan for the fiscal year beginning July 1.

Districts will have flexibility in how the money is awarded based on local collective bargaining agreements.

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Community Contributor
8:27 am
Mon April 29, 2013

Desegregation Pioneer Recalls School Integration In Miami

A woman escorts her two daughters to Orchid Villa School in Miami during desegregation.

I was born in Nashville and spent the first four years of my life in Tuskegee, Ala.

My father, Dr. John O. Brown Sr., moved to Miami in 1955 to begin his practice in ophthalmology. To this day, I'm glad he did.

We had neighbors who were white and black. Our next-door neighbor was an older white lady who inspired my mother's love for growing orchids and my brother's passion for collecting butterflies.

I attended schools -- Jackson's Toddle Inn and Floral Heights -- that were all black. I remember those as happy years.

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Common Core
10:52 pm
Sun April 28, 2013

New Yorkers Sound Off On New Common Core Tests

Originally published on Fri April 26, 2013 2:03 pm

A professor at Teacher’s College, Columbia University has set up a website to allow New York students, parents and educators to post comments about the new state English language arts test.

The tests are now tied to Common Core education standards adopted by 45 states — including Florida. New York students have been taking the exams for the first over the last few weeks.

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