education

When the latest “School Grades” were released last week, districts across the state scrambled to portray their results in the most favorable light possible: they focused on rules changes that led to a statewide drop in the proportion of A schools (Miami-Dade), or pointed out the number of schools that had held their A grades steady (Broward); they considered “A and B schools” together as a group.

 

 

laptop
Alan Joyce via Flikr / WLRN

Pass a class, get a free laptop.

 

High schoolers in Monroe County who might fear computer coding now have an incentive to add it to their class schedules.

 

The program Monroe Computes has promised a free laptop to all high school students in the county who successfully take and pass the advanced placement computer science class from Florida Virtual School.

 

Rowan Moore Gerety / WLRN

After a year in Bertha Vasquez’s class at George Washington Carver Middle School, 13-year-old Penny Richards says she reads climate news while she rides the bus to school.

When Lily Shum was little, she dreaded speaking up in class. It wasn't because she didn't have anything interesting to say, or because she wasn't paying attention or didn't know the answer. She was just quiet.

"Every single report card that I ever had says, 'Lily needs to talk more. She is too quiet,' " recalls Shum, now an assistant director at Trevor Day School in Manhattan.

She doesn't want her students to feel the pressure to speak up that she felt.

"Why are traffic lights red, yellow and green?"

When a child asks you a question like this, you have a few options. You can shut her down with a "Just because." You can explain: "Red is for stop and green is for go." Or, you can turn the question back to her and help her figure out the answer with plenty of encouragement.

The nation's colleges and universities have been on pins and needles waiting for the U.S. Supreme Court to decide whether race can be a factor in their admissions policies.

And so today's 4-3 ruling upholding the affirmative-action program at the University of Texas at Austin brought a sigh of relief to much of the higher education world.

Something's wrong in America's classrooms.

According to new data from the Education Department, black students — from kindergarten through high school — are 3.8 times more likely to be suspended than white students.

Now the really bad news.

This trend begins in preschool, where black children are already 3.6 times more likely to be suspended than white students.

Rowan Moore Gerety / WLRN

Nadiam Nesbitt sat two young men across from one another, called them Interviewer and Interviewee, and posed a question: “You’re the manager at Starbucks. What kind of questions would you ask him?”

 

The Interviewer blushed, averted his eyes, pleaded, “I don’t know anything about Starbucks.”

“What skills would you look for?” Nesbitt prodded.

 

“If he knew how to make coffee?” the Interviewer asked tentatively.

 

Gage Skidmore

Nearly four months after suspending his failed presidential campaign, former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush is making his way back into politics on familiar ground. At the end of May, Bush re-took the helm of his advocacy organization, Foundation for Excellence in Education.

When students get suspended from school for a few days, they may not be the only ones who miss out.

A report released today by UCLA's Civil Rights Project tries for the first time to quantify the full social cost of so-called "exclusionary discipline."

How do you teach kids about ecology when the natural world is shrinking around them?

In fast growing Florida, one solution is to take environmental studies outside the walls of a classroom.

Mort Elementary School is one of Tampa’s lowest-performing elementary schools situated in one the most troubled neighborhoods in Hillsborough County.

In 25 years though, officials are hoping it will be a model of success.

To Get Kids To Breakfast, Schools Try Take-Out

May 6, 2016
Rowan Moore Gerety / WLRN

Walk into any classroom at Deerfield Beach Middle School and you won’t have trouble spotting the students who missed breakfast. “They’re the ones who are antsy during first and second period,” said Principal Francine Baugh, “waiting for lunch to begin.”

There are many qualities of a great teacher. Two big ones? Kindness and a willingess to make learning fun. At least that's what Marlem Diaz-Brown's fourth-graders say.

For our 50 Great Teachers project, we've searched all over for teachers like her. Which brought us to Sunset Elementary School in Miami ... and "Mrs. D-B."

A School Field Trip, For Parents!

Apr 28, 2016
Sue Stocker/Sun Sentinel

Faced with the issue of low parent involvement, Plantation Elementary decided to turn the field trip on its head.

 

On Monday it was the parents who climbed on board a school bus while the students spent their day in class.

 

I spoke to the principal of the school, Judith Pitter, about where she got the idea for a parents-only field trip.

 

 

Where did you get the idea for a parents-only field trip?

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