depression

It's tough to be a teenager. Hormones kick in, peer pressures escalate and academic expectations loom large. Kids become more aware of their environment in the teen years — down the block and online. The whole mix of changes can increase stress, anxiety and the risk of depression among all teens, research has long shown.

Things were already going pretty badly for Florence Manyande. Then one day last spring, while walking down the street, she was hit by a car.

"This woman saw, and she pulled me out of the road." recalls Manyande, 50. "She tried to talk to me, but I couldn't talk then. I had a lot on my mind."

Vincent Van Gogh's paintings might not make it obvious that he was an artist troubled with depression and mania. But a computer algorithm might be able to figure that out. Computer programs are getting pretty good at discovering health information by studying heaps of social media data.

A computer script analyzed galleries of photos posted to Instagram and accurately predicted if the users had depression, according to a study posted this month to the public online repository arXiv.com.

https://twitter.com/JonRottenberg

04/15/14 - Tuesday’s Topical Currents looks at the epidemic of depression. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, major depressive disorder affects 6.7% of American adults, yet it’s root cause is little understood by scientists and the general population. We’ll speak with University of South Florida Professor and Psychologist, Jonathan Rottenberg who offers a bold new account of why depression endures. He’s written THE DEPTHS: THE EVOLUTIONARY ORIGINS OF THE DEPRESSION EPIDEMICThat’s Topical Currents Tuesday at 1pm.

How to Fall OUT of Love

Feb 11, 2014
http://www.drdphillips.com/

02/11/14 - Tuesday's Topical Currents begins with Dr. Deborah Phillips . . . her latest book is HOW TO FALL OUT OF LOVE.  She says our culture is geared to fall in love . . . but little advice is given to how to point the way out.  It can lead to depression . . . even suicide.