Researchers seeking to predict how Americans will vote have for years identified an important clue: The more religious you are, the more likely you are to lean Republican.

Conversations with more than two-dozen self-identified "faith" voters in Boone, N.C., suggest that pattern is holding this year, even while revealing the same high level of voter disenchantment evident across the country.

Muslims are a tiny fraction of the U.S. population, making up somewhere around one percent, according to the Pew Research Center.

But a lot of Muslims live in key battleground states like Florida, Virginia, Michigan, Pennsylvania, and Ohio, which makes them a small but important group.

That's why Hillary Clinton's campaign is trying to make sure they show up in large numbers on Election Day.

Republicans and Democrats have moved further and further from each other over the last few decades. The result has been gridlock and partisan vitriol like many Americans have never seen in their lifetimes.

As it turns out, it's not just about beliefs: according to a new report from the Pew Research Center, "the two parties look less alike today than at any point over the last quarter-century."

Hillary Clinton's increasingly dominant lead in the presidential race is solidifying many Republicans' worst 2016 fears that Donald Trump will cost the party not only the White House but also control of the Senate.

"The bottom is starting to fall out a little earlier than expected," says a top Senate GOP campaign aide who requested anonymity to speak candidly about the state of the race. "We started off with a very difficult map. No matter what, this was going to be a very difficult year."

Monday is the last day Duval voters can change their party affiliation before the Aug. 30 primary election.

Florida is a closed-primary state, which typically means Democrats can only vote within the same party and Republicans can only vote for Republicans. 

If internet searches are any indication -- and that’s a big “if,” -- Democrats will get a bigger bump from their national convention than Republicans.

Patrick Farrell / Miami Herald

One day after splitting the primaries in Michigan and Mississippi — and less than a week before the Florida Primary — Democratic presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders debated Wednesday night in front of an enthusiastic and engaged audience at Miami-Dade College's Kendall campus, which Clinton referred to as "the largest college in North America."

This story was first published by Vermont Public Radio.

Sen. Bernie Sanders spends a lot of time on the presidential campaign trail talking about the plight of the middle class and the prodigality of the "one percent."

Meanwhile, Sanders and his wife, Jane, were likely in about the top 5 percent of American income earners last year, according to copies of their 2014 tax returns obtained by Vermont Public Radio.

Democrats are stinging from Tuesday’s mid-term election results – starting with Charlie Crist’s 1 percent loss to incumbent Republican Governor Rick Scott.

Flickr / Bill Selak

Teacher unions everywhere are mad.

Educators say after 12 years of implementing standardized tests nationwide those assessments are proving impediments to teachers. If they don't get the reforms they’re demanding they say the president should oust his secretary of education, Arne Duncan.

South Florida Democratic Congressman Alcee Hastings understands the anger directed towards Washington bureaucrats who, he says, play a limited role in what happens in Florida schools.

Debbie Wasserman Schultz / Courtesy

As chair of the Democratic National Committee, South Florida Congresswoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz faces a tough task in November: Keeping her party from losing its U.S. Senate majority and keeping the GOP from enlarging its majority in the U.S. House of Representatives. Polls so far indicate both could happen.

But in an interview with WLRN, Wasserman Schultz says she's convinced voters will ultimately reject Republican "extremism" and what she calls the GOP's "distractions" strategy.

Florida’s Republican leaders announced their policy goals last month for the upcoming legislative session.

Rick Stone / WLRN

The election results and new leadership in the Florida legislature have made life a little easier for the state's elected Democrats.

Not that that there's been a substantial change in how the state's laws are made. The elections may have stripped House and Senate Republicans of their super-majorities, but Democrats remain profoundly outvoted and relatively powerless.

The Rise Of The Cuban-American Democrat

Jan 16, 2013


The Cuban-American Democrat. It is an unusual breed in Florida.

Since the failed Bay of Pigs invasion in 1961 made the Democratic administration of John F. Kennedy look bad, and caused many Cubans to flee their homeland forever,  El Exilio community in South Florida especially has been strongly Republican.

But that's beginning to change. Some exit polling indicated Cubans nearly split their vote between President Obama and Mitt Romney this past election, something that has never happened.

House of Representatives

Among the more than 80 House freshmen who were sworn in this week, there were several who had been there before — including Florida Democrat Alan Grayson.

After starting his first term four years ago, Grayson quickly made a name for himself with biting comments targeting Republicans — like when he said during the health care debate: "If you get sick, America, the Republican health care plan is this: Die quickly."

His national stature, however, didn't prevent him from being defeated in 2010. But now Grayson is back.

'The People United'