death row

A Death Row Inmate's Final Hours

Oct 5, 2017
man's face
Miami Herald / WLRN

Death Row inmate Michael Lambrix was set to become the second person in the state of Florida to be executed this year, as of Thursday evening. The state has had a long debate about the death penalty, but executions have resumed after the U.S. Supreme Court previously declared Florida's sentencing process to be unconstitutional. 

Lambrix, 57, has been on Death Row for 34 years. He was convicted in 1984 of killing two people, but has always maintained that he is innocent.  

Florida Department of Corrections

While the state of Florida is set to execute the first person in more than a year and a half, 150 other Death Row inmates await new sentences.

The death penalty was put on hold in the state after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in the landmark case of Hurst v. Florida that the process applied for sentencing someone to death was unconstitutional. 

Florida Department of Corrections

The state of Florida is poised to execute the first person in more than a year and a half this Thursday, August 24. 

Florida Department of Corrections

Florida keeps inching closer to having a working death penalty in the state.

This week, the Senate Criminal Justice Committee overwhelmingly approved a measure that would now require a unanimous jury to sentence someone to death. The House Criminal Justice Subcommittee is slated to hear a similar bill on Feb. 15.

Miami Herald File

Some of the nearly 400 prisoners waiting on Florida’s Death Row will not be allowed a re-sentencing under new death penalty laws, the state Supreme Court ruled Thursday.

The 6-1 ruling in a death sentence appeal by Mark James Asay says that Death Row inmates are not entitled to a re-sentencing unless their case was finalized after the 2002 ruling in Ring vs. Arizona, which required juries to find aggravating factors to impose the death penalty.

Justices Reject Death Row Inmate’s Appeal

Dec 16, 2016

The Florida Supreme Court on Thursday unanimously rejected an appeal by a Death Row inmate sentenced to death for shooting and robbing a man lured from a gay bar.

Fair Punishment Project

Florida is an outlier when it comes to sentencing people to death.

State Archives of Florida, Florida Memory, https://floridamemory.com/items/show/28908 - See more at: https://www.floridamemory.com/items/show/28908#sthash.wG69WisW.dpuf

The death of an inmate on Florida's death row is being investigated as a potential crime, according to the state Department of Corrections.

Lloyd Chase Allen, 69, died Wednesday at the state prison hospital in Lake Butler.

He had been on Death Row since 1993, when he was convicted in Monroe Circuit Court of first degree murder for the stabbing death of Dortha Cribbs.

Kittisak / freedigitalphotos.net

The U.S. Supreme Court this fall will hear arguments in a challenge to the way Florida sentences people to death --- a challenge backed by three former Florida Supreme Court justices and the American Bar Association.

The case, which stems from the 1998 murder of an Escambia County fast-food worker, focuses on the role that juries play in recommending death sentences, which ultimately are imposed by judges.

Florida Department of Corrections

Over the last several years, European drug manufacturers have tried to limit the use of their products in lethal injection executions. As a result, death penalty states were left scrambling to find replacements.

In 2013, Florida began using a new drug called midazolam that is now the subject of a U.S. Supreme Court case: Glossip v. Gross. The state, which has one of the most active active death chambers, has halted all executions for the past six months awaiting a decision on the case.

Miami Herald

  The Supreme Court will examine Florida's capital punishment system in its next term, and legal experts believe Florida's death penalty itself may be in danger.

A solution could be in a legislative fix now moving slowly through the Capitol in Tallahassee. It's been passed by one Senate committee but the House is showing little interest in the companion bill.

www.youtube.com/user/witnesstoinnocence

12/17/14 - Join us for Wednesday’s Topical Currents when we examine death penalty arguments. Twenty-five condemned prisoners have been spared death in Florida since 1973 . . . that’s one exoneration for every four executions. We’ll speak with criminal trial lawyer Richard S. Jaffe of the Birmingham, Alabama law firm of Jaffe and Drennan, P.C.; Mark Elliott, Executive Director of Floridians for Alternatives to the Death Penalty; Herman Lindsey, exonerated Florida Death Row inmate. That’s Topical Currents Wednesday at 1pm.

Creative Commons via WikiCommons / Illustration by Wilson Sayre

UPDATE 6/2/2014: The City of Pembrook Pines has won their bid for the empty prison. Mayor Frank Ortis says the City wanted to control what happened with the land which is not far from houses that fall within city limits.

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A 66-acre plot of land off Sheridan Street has excellent security features, and it will soon be on the market. The Broward County Correctional Institution, a former women’s prison, is being sold off by the state.

http://www.skv.com/attorneys/david-r.-dow/

01/31/14 - This is a Topical Currents online bonus segment. After the broadcast, there were many unanswered questions.  Host Bonnie Berman continues the conversation with Texas attorney David Dow, who’s defended some 100 death row inmates and witnessed many executions.  He says he knows some were innocent.  He’s written a book which considers death philosophically, but not just by execution.

01/29/14 Wednesday's Topical Currents is with Texas attorney David Dow, who’s defended some 100 death row inmates and witnessed many executions.  He says he knows some were innocent.  He’s written a book which considers death philosophically, but not just by execution.  Is it better to anticipate one’s death and prepare for it?  Or is it better to go quickly, quietly, without warning?

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