death penalty

Florida Fights To Keep Lethal Drug Records Secret

Jul 13, 2016

Lawyers representing seven Arizona Death Row inmates want information about the drugs used in Florida's lethal-injection procedure, but corrections officials are asking a judge to keep the documents secret.

Kyle Pegolo/flickr

A new poll is out that looks at the attitudes of Miamians on numerous issues. The poll was commissioned by WLRN, el Nuevo Herald, the Miami Herald, and Univision 23.

Department of Corrections

Gov. Rick Scott signed into law a new pathway to sentence someone to death Monday. These changes came nearly two months after the U.S. Supreme Court took issue with Florida’s old system for handing down the sentence in the Hurst v. Florida case.

The basis for the decision was that in Florida the jury only recommended the death penalty. The judge  made the final decision. The high court found that that system violated the Sixth Amendment to the Constitution. A question the court left unanswered was whether a non-unanimous jury recommendation was also constitutionally problematic.

Florida Department of Corrections

The stark room that plays host to Florida's most severe punishment and the theater from which onlookers watch may be back in business soon.

The state Senate Thursday passed a bill finalizing procedures for sentencing someone to death in Florida. The bill, on its way to the governor’s desk, does not require a unanimous jury in handing down that sentence. Despite early signs that the Legislature might consider requiring a unanimous jury, the final language only requires 10 of 12 jurors to agree to sentence someone to death.

Florida Dept. of Corrections

The death penalty might soon be back in Florida.

Legislation that sets up new guidelines on how to hand down that sentence passed a final Senate committee Thursday. Florida had to rewrite these procedures after the U.S. Supreme Court struck them down earlier this year.

Last week the Florida House passed a bill that requires 10 of 12 jurors to agree to the death sentence, but until Thursday's committee meeting, the Senate version would have required a unanimous jury.

Doug Smith / Florida Department of Corrections

  The death penalty might be back in Florida soon as new rules on how defendants are given the sentence eek closer to becoming law.

A state Senate committee will hear the legislation along with new amendments that would bring the Senate and House bills in line with each other. But the mother of a murder victim hopes the Legislature will consider making it harder for juries to impose the death penalty.

In July of 2013, 20-year-old Shelby Farah was working alone in a MetroPCS store when James Rhodes walked in and shot her.

Linnette Vasquez/flickr

It's a Valentine’s Day edition of the Florida Roundup featuring husband-and-wife media teams.

The Florida legislative session is at its midpoint. The death penalty remains on the agenda. The House and Senate are split over whether juries should agree unanimously in capital punishment cases.

Jan. 12, 2016 turned out to be Cary Lambrix’s lucky day.

It was on that day the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Florida's death sentencing process was unconstitutional because it gives judges rather than juries the power to condemn someone to death. As a result, Lambrix, who’s been on Death Row for 31 years for murdering two people in Glades County, had his Feb. 11, 2016 execution blocked by the Florida Supreme court.

The U.S. Supreme Court ruling now has Florida lawmakers racing to fix the state's way of dispensing capital punishment.

Dale/flickr

The Florida Roundup looks at the death penalty, heavy rains, fracking and more this week.

The Florida Supreme Court stopped one execution as questions continue around the process of how Florida decides the death penalty. Dozens of inmates on death row could challenge their sentences.

South Florida is being drenched by historic rains in the midst of what is supposed to be the dry season. Lake Okeechobee is swollen, sending dirty water into rivers and raising worries about pollution.

Florida Department of Corrections

NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDA/TALLAHASSEE

Hours after listening to arguments about the impact of a U.S. Supreme Court decision that struck down the state's death-penalty sentencing system, the Florida Supreme Court issued an indefinite stay of execution for Cary Michael Lambrix, who had been scheduled to die Feb. 11.

Tuesday's unanimous order also denied Lambrix's request to send the case to a lower court, meaning the Florida Supreme Court is likely to weigh in on the sentencing issue.

Florida's highest court on Tuesday will hear a case that may determine the fate of some 390 people on the state's death row. Last month, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Florida's system for imposing the death penalty is unconstitutional.

Florida has an execution set for next week. The state's highest court now must decide whether it can go forward.

Execution Delay Sought Amid Missing Records

Jan 19, 2016
Florida Department of Corrections.

Attorneys for a convicted murderer scheduled to be put to death on St. Patrick's Day are asking the Florida Supreme Court for a stay, arguing that records --- including some stored in an insect-infested shed --- were destroyed.

Mark James Asay's case is even more troubling because the Death Row inmate hasn't had a lawyer to represent him in state court for nearly a decade and had no legal representation when Gov. Rick Scott signed the warrant ordering Asay's execution, Asay's new attorney wrote in a motion filed Tuesday.

Fl. Supreme Court Schedules Death Penalty Arguments

Jan 18, 2016

The Florida Supreme Court has refused to grant a stay in an execution scheduled for next month but ordered oral arguments to hear about the potential impact of a seminal U.S. Supreme Court decision this week striking down the state's death penalty sentencing structure.

The U.S. Supreme Court says Florida’s practice of deciding if someone gets the death penalty is unconstitutional. What does this mean for the almost 400 people on Florida’s death row? Will the legislature try to change the process?

The first flight of Cuban migrants stuck in Costa Rica landed in El Salvador this week … as they hope to come to the U.S. In Washington, Senator and Republican presidential candidate Marco Rubio filed legislation to change the benefits Cuban immigrants get when they make it to the U.S.

Florida Dept. of Corrections

In a decision a former state Supreme Court justice called "monumental," the U.S. Supreme Courton Tuesday struck down Florida's capital-punishment sentencing system, saying that juries --- not judges--- should be responsible for imposing the death penalty.

The 8-1 decision coincided with the opening day of the 2016 legislative session, sending Republican lawmakers scrambling to address what could have far-reaching implications on death penalty cases throughout the state.

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