Dance

Allison Light / WLRN

This story was updated on Thursday, July 13 at 5:25pm.

The twelve kids slated to join Pink Floyd's Roger Waters Thursday night at the AmericanAirlines Arena will no longer participate in the event.

The local students, ages 10 to 15, were chosen from AYUDA Miami's T.A.L.L program and Miami Beach Parks and Recreation's summer Teen Club to join Waters onstage. The kids were to join Waters on the song, "Another Brick in the Wall (Pt. II)." 

Nancy Klingener / WLRN

The island at the end of the road has been the subject of a lot of different works of art in its time — paintings, poems, songs and novels. Now different forms of art are coming together in a site-specific performance piece called Key West Reverie.

Daniel Azoulay / Miami City Ballet

Patricia Delgado was 11 years old the first time she walked into the Miami City Ballet studios to take class. Her sister Jeanette was nine.

Courtesy Dance Now! Miami

Dance Now! Miami’s latest dance piece is a direct response to President Donald Trump.

“Bridges Not Walls” was conceived during the presidential race when the then-presidential candidate Trump repeatedly declared that he would build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border.

“When Donald Trump came up and made those comments about immigrants, specifically coming from Mexico, we were at that time in the process of creating a collaboration with a Mexican [dance] company and so we thought that that was the moment to respond,” said Dance Now Co-Director  Diego Salterini.

Nadege Green / WLRN

Jacoria Adams reads her homework aloud:

“Dream, dream and believe. Dream, believe and dance to the beat.”

Her poem is inspired by Alvin Ailey’s dance, “Night Creature.” 

Larry Chidsey / Courtesy

When composer Carlos Surinach emigrated to the United States from Spain in the early 1950s, he took with him the memories of his homeland's flamenco-style music.

He's often best remembered for his collaboration with masters of modern dance, including Martha Graham and Doris Humphrey.

Surinach's "Ritmo Jondo" -- which translates to "deep rhythm " -- was used for a dance piece widely considered one of Humphrey's masterpieces.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

On any given night in South Florida you can find a place to dance salsa, merengue or bachata. But when you think about going out to dance in Miami, contra dance is not high on the list, if it’s on the list at all.

Alicia Zuckerman / WLRN

We originally ran this story last year when Dance Now Miami first performed Edward Stierle's "Lacrymosa." The ballet was a response to the 1980 AIDS crisis and stands as its creator's own requiem. The company will perform the ballet again on Monday, May 29 at the Colony Theatre on Miami Beach, in conjunction with the World Out Games, which celebrates LGBTQ sports and culture. This year, the lead role will be danced by Harold Berry.

Nadege Green / WLRN

Marjorie Burnett is one of the founding members of Karen Peterson and Dancers, a mixed-ability dance company in Miami.

Burnett has cerebral palsy, and in the latest piece she’s rehearsing  she wants to challenge how people look at her because she’s in wheelchair.

“I want to show the audience that I’m a real person,” she says.

Burnett, 54, is performing with guest choreographer Pioneer Winter.  The piece is entitled “Gimp Gait,” a nod to the stereotypes and slurs used against people with disabilities.

Erin Stover-Sickmen / The Studios of Key West

  While the sunset into the Gulf of Mexico gets a nightly celebration at Mallory Square in Key West, the sunrise gets less public attention.

That will change for at least one day on Saturday, with Key West's first Water Dance. The performance is part of a national project that aims at bringing attention to water issues.

Nadege Green / WLRN

Zest Collective, a New York-based dance company, is in Fort Lauderdale for a one-night performance.

Gentry George, the collective’s founder, was born and raised in Miami. This is the company’s first performance outside of New York, and George says it’s only natural that he came home.

George, who also dances with the Dance Theatre of Harlem, says Wednesday night’s performance, "Courageous Chapel, Abandoning Theater," is largely inspired by his experience in the church.

Nadege Green / WLRN

Diaunte Jenkins’ introduction to dance was at family gatherings and barbecues.

When the beat dropped, he was the kid delighting the crowd with the latest hip-hop moves.

“From that point on I realized this is my gift because I would be doing it really everywhere I go,” he said.

In church, he was more subdued. That’s where he picked up worship and liturgical dances.

And by the time he figured out he wanted to pursue dance formally, he knew his neighborhood school in Liberty City, Miami Northwestern High , had a performing arts magnet program.

Black Girl: Linguistic Play By Camille A. Brown

Feb 19, 2016
John Power

Choreographer Camille Brown is in Miami to promote her new program. On Thursday, she hosted a demonstration and discussion at Miami Dade College North Campus.

 

Brown previewed an excerpt from her show “Black Girl: Linguistic Play,” which addresses the identity of a black woman in  American culture. It uses the rhythmic play of double-dutch, stepping, tap, ring shout and other African-American social dances.

 

Nadege Green / WLRN

Robert Battle is the artistic director of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater.

He was raised in Liberty City by his cousin Dessie Horne,  who he calls his mother. Horne is a deeply spiritual woman who helped shape his love for the arts.

Battle rarely lets an interview go by without mentioning her impact on him.

She’s his biggest cheerleader and his inspiration. 

On a recent afternoon,  Battle and Horne sat down  at the African Heritage Cultural Arts Center in Liberty City and reminisced.

Listen to the  conversation below:

Marsha Halper / Miami Herald

“In Haiti,  you always have the feeling it’s the first day. Every day is like Monday morning,” said Jean Guy Saintus, founder and director of Haitian dance company Ayikodans.

Whenever a dance performance is getting close, Saintus warns his dancers that this might be the only rehearsal they get.

“The piece needs to be ready tonight to be able to perform tomorrow. You never know what can happen tomorrow in Haiti,” he tells them.

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