curious news

Lindsay met a man named Howard on a dating site, fell in love, got married and added Durdle to her name.

Howard said they lived happily for a decade until she got sick — breast cancer — twice. She struggled. It spread. And she died on May 31.

On Tuesday of this week, Lindsay received a letter at what had been her home in Bucklebury, England.

"Important - You should read this notice carefully," the correspondence from PayPal began.

Just over two weeks after she was crowned the World's Ugliest Dog, Zsa Zsa, an English bulldog with a penchant for pink and a perpetually lolling tongue, has died. She was 9.

"I'm sad to share that Zsa Zsa passed away in her sleep last night," reads a message from her owner, Megan Brainard, a pet groomer in Minnesota.

A man with a python hidden inside an external hard drive was stopped from boarding a Florida plane headed to Barbados.

Updated at 2 p.m. ET Friday

One of the upsides to hosting the World Cup is the hordes of international tourists and their bulging wallets that will inevitably descend. One of the downsides is the logistics of accommodating those tourists and their corporeal needs, including bathing.

At least, that's one of the adjustments the Russian city of Samara is trying to make.

Many oncology patients swear off alcohol during treatment, but in the Czech Republic, where beer is the national beverage, cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy have a new option.

For years, a U.S. Postal Service stamp mistakenly bore the image of a Lady Liberty replica.

That statue welcomes visitors to the New York-New York Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas, and between 2010 and 2014, it earned the Postal Service over $70 million in profits.

Last week, Las Vegas sculptor Robert Davidson was awarded $3.5 million from the Postal Service in a lawsuit.

The confusion started a decade ago, when the Postal Service decided to update its line of "forever" stamps with an image featuring Lady Liberty.

A USF professor rewrote a tasty part of Italian history after running tests on the inside of a 4,000 year-old jar found in a prehistoric settlement in Castelluccio, Italy.

Milos Zeman, president of the Czech Republic, had an important announcement — but he wanted it to be a surprise. So he called a news conference Thursday.

In the spring of 2014, Eric Abramovitz got the opportunity of a lifetime.

He just didn't know it.

Abramovitz was the victim of a deception that a Canadian judge called "despicable," as he granted Abramovitz $350,000 Canadian dollars (more than $260,000 U.S.) in damages.

An "official oracle" has spoken — or eaten, technically — and predicted victory for Russia.

That was the news from St. Petersburg Wednesday after Achilles the cat picked Russia to win the opening match of the World Cup on Thursday in a game against Saudi Arabia.

Updated at 3:21 p.m. ET

For hours, her life was like a highlight reel of daring stunts and escapes — but now, a raccoon that mesmerized people by climbing a tall building in St. Paul, Minn., has been trapped and is safe.

"In our office we are just glad he is safe. We were all worried about him," said Sheila Donnelly-Coyne, an attorney whose firm, Paige Donnelly, is on the 23rd floor of the UBS building. (It was later determined that the critter is female.)

Archaeologists working at Pompeii say they have found the remains of a man who survived the initial explosion of Mount Vesuvius in A.D. 79 — but was crushed by a massive rock as he attempted to flee a deadly cloud of gases, ash and rock.

The skeleton's remains are in what the Pompeii archaeological site calls a "dramatic position" — with a large rectangular stone embedded in the upper torso.

If Stonehenge Monument were an ice cream, it would be a delicious bowl of vanilla blended with bits of oats and hazelnuts and honey swirls.

At least according to Hannah Spiegelman, a small-batch ice cream maker in Baltimore who explores the sweet — as well as salty, spicy and even a little nutty — sides of historical people and places through A Sweet History, her blog, Instagram feed and occasional pop-up stand of the same name.

As secret recordings go, the Portland couple's conversation was pretty mundane: They were talking about hardwood floors.

But their Amazon Echo was listening and recording their discussion. The device then sent the recording to someone in their contacts — without the couple's knowledge.

The promise of adventure didn't do it. Neither did the lure of independence, or the weight of his 30 years. Instead, it took a judge to pry Michael Rotondo from his parents' home. The New York couple won an eviction order against their son after a judge argued with Rotondo for 30 minutes.

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