culture

Birthday Bird
8:00 am
Sat November 23, 2013

A Word On Food: Chicken Fricassee

Click the play button above to hear the radio version of this post by Norman Van Aken.

A dramatic rainstorm was rolling through the lower Florida Keys as we tried to decide what to make for breakfast the day after our granddaughter Audrey’s first birthday.

My daughter-in-law Lourdes wisely poured some freshly squeezed orange juice and put some of her homemade banana bread in the toaster to stave off the equally volatile storms of unquenched thirsts or insatiable appetites propelled and honestly worsened by our practice of morning café con leches.

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Miami Book Fair International
11:25 am
Mon November 18, 2013

Here's A Peek At MBFI's 30th Year Of Events

Credit Claudia H. Munoz

The Miami Book Fair International, celebrating its 30th Anniversary this year, will not only host a ton of books both new and used, major and underground – there’s also extensive programming that will likely cause bibliophiles to salivate.

Throughout the week of the fair, a slew of notable authors (more than 400) will be speaking about their work, and panels will be held on a wide range of literary subjects.

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Language
11:35 am
Tue October 29, 2013

Talk To The Head Honcho; He Speaks Japanese

The Japanese army presses forward in the Pacific theater during World War II.
Keystone Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 29, 2013 12:47 pm

Picture the "head honcho" of an organization and what comes to mind are boardrooms, power and wealth, an individual at the top of his or her game.

But where did the word "honcho" originate? While the word is often mistakenly believed to have Spanish origins, it actually traces its roots to American soldiers who fought in the Pacific during World War II.

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People
12:26 pm
Mon October 28, 2013

Lou Reed, Beloved Contrarian, Dies

Lou Reed onstage in London in 1975 playing a transparent, Plexiglass guitar. Reed died Sunday. He was 71.
Denis O'Regan Getty Images

Originally published on Sun October 27, 2013 5:59 pm

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Books
5:50 pm
Fri October 25, 2013

Little 'Libraires' That Could: French Law Would Keep Amazon At Bay

France's government has taken legal steps to protect the country's independent booksellers from behemoths like Amazon. It already prohibits discounts of more than 5 percent on books. Now it's considering a law that would not allow online retailers like Amazon to offer both a 5 percent discount and free shipping.
Christine Zenino Flickr

Originally published on Fri October 25, 2013 7:55 pm

Last year, the U.S. government took Apple to court, charging that the company illegally drove up the price of e-books. This summer, Apple lost the case.

In France, just the opposite is happening. The French government has accused Amazon of trying to push the price of physical books too low.

Limiting discounts on books is one of the ways that France is trying to ensure the survival of its independent booksellers.

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Business
5:48 pm
Fri October 25, 2013

New Amazon Centers Will Add Sales Tax To Florida Purchases

An Amazon fulfillment center.
Credit Flickr

The confirmation by Amazon.com that it will build a pair of massive "fulfillment" centers along the Interstate 4 corridor means that sometime in the next two years Floridians will have to start paying sales taxes on purchases from the online retail giant.

But even with Amazon eventually joining other businesses located in Florida in collecting the state's sales tax, some groups will continue pushing to eliminate an exemption that has allowed out-of-state online retailers including eBay and Overstock to avoid the tax.

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Community Contributor
7:00 am
Fri October 25, 2013

Why Bridal Showers Remain A Rite Of Passage For Cuban Wives, Mothers

Mimosas, that sweet and sparkly celebratory concoction so popular at bridal showers, where women sip, whisper and share.

I recently attended a bridal shower, one of those consequences that I face as a result of accumulating too much bad karma. I am only half kidding. There’s just something awful about one hundred or so women in one room. There’s only so much gossip, small talk and platitudes that I can take.

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Music
2:10 pm
Thu October 24, 2013

Soothing The Savage Beat: When Electronic Artists Conjure Classical

Electronic artists such as Mason Bates (pictured above), Aphex Twin and Tiësto have blended classical music into their dance beats.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu October 24, 2013 10:19 am

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Arts Season
8:57 am
Thu October 24, 2013

South Florida Maker Movement Grows With Events, Spaces, Fair

Bibi Nin works on her project during the Cardboard Challenge at the Miami Science Museum on Oct. 5.
Credit Peter Andrew Bosch / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

It’s entirely appropriate that Makers Square is a work in progress.

The grounds surrounding the brick-red building are covered with projects under construction, including large aquaponic planters built from pallets for herbs and fruit trees.

Nine shipping containers are being repurposed as classrooms, a pottery studio, a photography studio and rentable individual workspaces. Also in the plans: The roofs of those containers will be covered with gardens.

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Beatles Mania
3:36 pm
Wed October 23, 2013

Were You One Of The Miami Teens Photographed By Beatle Ringo Starr In 1964?

Beatles' drummer Ringo Starr is looking for these teenagers in Miami Beach whom he photographed on the band's first U.S. tour in 1964.
Credit Ringo Starr/Genesis Publications

Update 3:12 p.m. Oct. 24: The mystery of the identity of the kids in a car whose photo was snapped by Ringo Starr during The Beatles first visit to the America may have been solved.

Sadly, Starr may have gotten his cities mixed up. The photo was likely not taken in Miami, but in New York.

A Boston attorney says he recognizes the kids in the photograph, which began circulating earlier this week, as his classmates at Fair Lawn Senior High School in New Jersey in 1964.

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Ethnicity
7:32 am
Wed October 23, 2013

Pew: Most Latinos Can't Name 'Most Important Hispanic Leader'

Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor was named by 5 percent of respondents as "the most important Hispanic leader in the country today."
Win McNamee AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 6:54 pm

While most Latinos believe it's important for their community to have a national leader, most of them can't pinpoint whom they think that leader is.

That's the new finding from a survey released today by the Pew Research Hispanic Trends Project. Survey participants were asked an open-ended question to name the person they think is "the most important Hispanic leader in the country today."

Sixty-two percent responded they didn't know and 9 percent said no one.

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Arts Season
3:24 pm
Tue October 15, 2013

New Drive-In Theater Is A Blast From The Past For Miami's Wynwood

The Blue Starlite Theater attracted a small lot full of cars to watch classic film, Back to the Future.
Credit Chloe Herring

Twenty-one cars gathered on Oct. 11 for the grand opening of the new Blue Starlite drive-in theater in Wynwood, and to catch a new spin on the blast-from-the-past movie classic “Back to the Future.”

Guests to the Blue Starlite were greeted by owner Josh Frank’s staff, and cars were personally escorted. As night fell, children made their way to the hoods of their parents’ cars and affectionate lovers held hands. Movie-goers were encouraged to bring their own snacks, but concession was provided accompanied by sounds of vintage concession advertisements.

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Culture
2:24 pm
Tue October 15, 2013

One Roof, Many Generations: Redefining The Single-Family Home

Three generations live under this roof: (from left) 19-year-old Jamie Dusseault, grandmother Jacque Ruggles, mother Marci Dusseault and 22-year-old Chelsie Dusseault.
Peter O'Dowd KJZZ

Originally published on Mon October 28, 2013 10:12 am

New homes are back in a big way — literally. This summer, a typical new house in Phoenix was more than 20 percent larger than a resale home as builders across the country added more space to accommodate post-recession lifestyles.

Take Jacque Ruggles' family, for example. Four women from three generations live under one roof.

"I'm the matriarch," Ruggles says. "I'm grandma."

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Culture
3:11 pm
Mon October 14, 2013

Holding Onto The Other Half Of 'Mixed-Race'

Wilma Stordahl with her sons (from left) Kevin, Kazon and Kenneth at Kazon's high school graduation. "We think of Norwegians as being tall and blond and blue-eyed," Stordahl says. "My sons are tall — but they're not blond and blue-eyed."
Courtesy of Wilma Stordahl

Originally published on Mon October 14, 2013 12:14 pm

NPR continues a series of conversations about The Race Card Project, where thousands of people have submitted their thoughts on race and cultural identity in six words. Every so often NPR Host/Special Correspondent Michele Norris will dip into those six-word stories to explore issues surrounding race and cultural identity for Morning Edition.

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Arts Season
4:22 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

How Rookies, Veterans Breathed New Life Into Palm Beach County Theater

'The Sound Of Music' was the debut show at The Wick Theatre, a new player on the theater scene in Palm Beach County.
Credit Amy Pasquantonio

It was a recession-era wallop that left South Florida theater circles reeling: the 2011 shuttering of Manalapan’s Florida Stage, followed almost immediately by the closing of Boca Raton’s Caldwell Theatre Company.

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