Culture

Arts and culture

What are you reading? WLRN wants to know — and we'll share what we, and other people in the South Florida community, are reading every week in this space.

Tell us what you're reading by replying in the comments, or tweet us @WLRN with the hashtag #FridayReads

Lydia Martin, Miami journalist and fiction writer

Luis Hernandez

Bad news for South Florida gamers: we are NOT No. 1.

The financial website  WalletHub has come out with its list of best cities in the U.S. for gamers and we barely made it to the middle of the pack. They look at a few factors, including access to WiFi, nearby arcades, video games stores and the number of eSports tournaments

Roxane Gay has finally written the book that she "wanted to write the least."

The author of Bad Feminist and Difficult Women says the moment she realized that she would "never want to write about fatness" was the same moment she knew this was the book she needed to write. The result is Hunger: A Memoir of (My) Body.

Tracy K. Smith knows many readers are intimidated by line breaks. She knows people don't like identifying consonance, assonance or alliteration.

But Smith — the newly announced 22nd Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry of the United States — wants to help America push past that anxiety.

"What do you hear? What do you feel? What does this remind you of?" she asks NPR. "These are all real and valid reactions to a poem."

What are you reading? WLRN wants to know — and we'll share what we, and other people in the South Florida community, are reading every week in this space.

Tell us what you're reading by replying in the comments, or tweet us @WLRN with the hashtag #FridayReads

Cynthia Chinelly, poet and associate director of the Florida International University writing program

There's a classic moment in the romantic thriller Charade, when Audrey Hepburn says to Cary Grant in exasperation, "Do you know what's the matter with you? ... Nothing."

For decades, the whole world felt the same. Grant's unrivaled blend of charm, good looks and silliness — he hadn't a shred of pomposity or elitism — made him a movie star everyone loved. Everyone, that is, except Archie Leach, the actor's real-life self who wrote that he'd spent years cautiously peering from behind the face of a man known as Cary Grant.

https://www.instagram.com/guardiansecurity/?hl=en

Arundhati Roy's Return To Fiction

Jun 6, 2017

With guest host Anthony Brooks.

20 years after her smashing debut, novelist Arundhati Roy’s back with a shattering mosaic of modern India.

Photography documents life — and food, whether in the fore or background, seems to always be in the picture. The two intersect in a new book, Feast for the Eyes, written by photography curator Susan Bright and published by Aperture.

Here's a classic scene from a telenovela.

It's the funeral of a very rich man whose heirs are battling over his fortune. An indignant woman says to a female guest: "You are disrupting the service. Who else would you be saving this seat for other than Richard Juma's second wife?"

Wonder Woman was a box office smash on its opening weekend, raking in more than $100 million domestically — a new record for a movie directed by a woman.

Deadline reported Monday that the final tally for the film was $103.1 million, even higher than the initial Sunday estimates.

That handily defeats the previous record for a movie directed by a woman — $85.1 million for Sam Taylor-Johnson's Fifty Shades of Grey.

What are you reading? WLRN wants to know — and we'll share what we, and other people in the South Florida community, are reading every week in this space.

Tell us what you're reading by replying in the comments, or tweet us @WLRN with the hashtag #FridayReads

Jeff Huffman, meteorologist at the Florida Public Radio Emergency Network

Ross McDonnell

In 2000, the United States and Cuba were at war. Not over embargoes or political ideology,  but over the future of a 6-year-old Cuban boy.

  The child had been found months earlier clinging to an inner tube off Florida after his mother and others drowned trying to reach the United States. In Cuba, his father wanted him back; his family in Miami wanted to keep him here.

The boy is a man now — and when he appears at the start of a new documentary that bears his name, he says simply: "I'm Elián González. You may remember me, you may not ..."

With guest host Sacha Pfeiffer

“Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band” gets remixed for its 50th anniversary. We’ll listen.

Humorist David Sedaris admits that his latest work, Theft by Finding, isn't exactly the book he set out to publish. It was originally meant to be a collection of funny diary entries, but then Sedaris' editor had a suggestion that changed its course.

"My editor said, 'Why don't you go back to the very beginning and find things that aren't necessarily funny and put those in as well?' " Sedaris says. "Soon those [entries] outweighed the funny ones, and the funny ones seemed almost over-produced, so I got rid of a lot of them."

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