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Whether you're into romance or science fiction, biographies and memoirs,  publishers know the summer is a big time for people to dive deep into a good story. Miami Herald's book critic Connie Ogle  has her reading list and recommendation to enjoy during the next weeks.

Saeed Adyani/Netflix

"Bloodline," the Netflix TV series set in the Florida Keys, is set to return for a third season.

That's according to social media posts on Twitter and Facebook, as well as a story in the Hollywood Reporter.

Pokémon Go, the popular smartphone game, is forcing South Florida gamers out of their homes and into the streets to look for imaginary creatures under the blazing sun.  

The popular application uses augmented reality and GPS tracking to make Pokemon creatures "appear" in your surroundings. The type of creatures also vary according to the time of the day. 

Nadege Green / WLRN

This story originally ran on September 22, 2015

I was born and raised in Miami, but my very Haitian mom always kept true to her roots — especially whenever I didn’t feel well.

Have a sore throat? Sour orange leaves can fix that.  A tummy ache? Freshly picked mint from the backyard will ease the pain.

She is a believer of remed fey, or bush medicine.

My mom comes from a line of Haitian women herbalists from Gonaives, Haiti.  She learned from her mother, who learned from her mother, who learned from her mother and so on.

Nancy Klingener / WLRN

  Denyse Woods has published five novels that have been translated into six languages.

But she said she was still surprised — and elated — when she learned that she had won the first Florida Keys Flash Fiction contest. Especially when she read the praise for her story from contest judge Karen Russell, author of "Swamplandia."

"I had to lie down for a few minutes," Woods said. "When somebody like that writes about your work in that way ... You need to take three deep breaths and pinch yourself. A lot."

Courtesy photo Little Free Libraries

Next time you see a newspaper box in Palm Beach County, look closer. It may be a “Little Free Library.”

Palm Beach County is adding some “fun-sized” libraries, as part of a worldwide initiative to encourage more kids to pick up a book and read.

 These colorful boxes are designed to encourage children between 4 to 16 years of age. The books were provided by Children's Services Council of Palm Beach County. 

Walter Michot / Miami Herald

The newest data from the U.S. Census shows Florida's population grew by almost a million and a half between 2010 and 2015. And, more than half of those new residents are Hispanic.

Note: This story first ran last summer. The group Mangoes to Share is back at it this summer, and they say they've been scheduling "non-stop" pickups.  Organizer Anna Milaeva tells us the owner of one vacant lot has given them carte blanche to pick mangoes from 30 trees on the property. They've been picking other fruit too, like star fruit, lychees and avocados.

The Miamians.org

"Down By The Old Mill Stream"?  Not likely.

"Wait 'Til The Sun Shines, Nellie"?  Nope.

"Let Me Call You Sweetheart"?  Don't even think about it.

The four members of Signature are going into an upcoming barbershop quartet singing competition with their rendition of Queen's "Somebody To Love."

"Yeah.  That's a monster!" says tenor Will Rodriguez with a laugh.  "Any time you sing Freddie Mercury . . ." The  31-year-old stops himself at the mention of the rock frontman, who reputedly had a four-octave singing range.

Julia Rose Photo

Miami said goodbye Wednesday evening to one of the pioneers of the craft beer movement in the city and did  it the way he would have liked it: by gathering at his beloved brewery and raising a pint (or two) in his name. 

Piero Rodriguez, one of the founding brewers at MIA Beer Company , passed away last weekend in a car accident.  Brewers from around South Florida and beyond have been posting their condolences online.

Old S&S Diner in South Miami Says Goodbye

Jun 16, 2016
diner
Caitie Switalski / WLRN

 

A small piece of Miami history, the diner inside Allen’s Drug Store, announced it’s closing its doors this summer after more than 60 years in business.

At breakfast time at the corner of Bird and Red roads in South Miami, people are ordering eggs, grits and pancakes while they still can.

 

ESSAY: Muhammad Ali, An American Poet

Jun 10, 2016

Clay comes out to meet Liston

And Liston starts to retreat.

If Liston goes back any further

He’ll end up in a ringside seat.

Luis Hernandez / WLRN

Recovering from a natural catastrophe, say like Hurricane Andrew, can sometimes be a long process. Take a look at Homestead.

In 1992, Andrew devastated the south Florida city, destroying the air force base, more than a thousand mobile homes, and one of the city's historic sites. Roughly a third of the population of 30,000 left shortly after the storm.

It didn't take long for housing and people to come back. But, the downtown area along Krome Avenue took a little longer, even though it had been historically the heart of the town.

Star Cuban Ballerinas Ready for Their U.S. Debut

Jun 8, 2016
Spencer Parts

Three of Cuba’s best dancers will make their U.S. debuts in the Cuban Classical Ballet of Miami’s performance next Saturday. The dancers came to the U.S. for the chance to expand their repertoire beyond classical ballet, but they start next Saturday with Giselle, a classic romantic ballet they knew well in Cuba.

Mayrel Martinez and Masiel Alonso were soloists in the Cuban National Ballet before they defected last month during a Cuban National Ballet tour in Canada. They arrived in the U.S. on May 9th. 

Nancy Klingener / WLRN

  Indian Key at first appears like a typical South Florida island — mangroves on the shore, buttonwoods inland.

  But Brad Bertelli sees a different place. He sees Indian Key from almost two centuries back.

"In its heyday, the island was home to as many as 150 people," Bertelli said. "There were 45 buildings. There was a hotel with a nine-pin bowling alley. Billiards tables, restaurant, saloon."

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