Cuba

Associated Press

President Barack Obama issued a statement saying that the United States is extending "a hand of friendship to the Cuban people" at the time of Fidel Castro's death, while president elect Donald Trump acknowledged the death of the Cuban leader with a short tweet. 

Obama said in a statement that "history will record and judge the enormous impact of this singular figure on the people and world around him."

The Cuban government has declared nine days of national mourning for the death of Fidel Castro, ending when his remains are interred on Dec. 4.

With a shaking voice, Raul Castro, announced on state television that his brother died at 10:29 p.m. on Friday night, and that his remains would be incinerated  Saturday.

Mourning, Celebration Follow Death Of Fidel Castro

Nov 26, 2016

Fidel Castro, the controversial ruler who took power during the Cuban revolution in 1959 and led his country for nearly half a century, died in Havana, Cuba, at age 90.

Castro lived through 10 U.S. presidents who were determined to overthrow him, as NPR's Tom Gjelten reported, in addition to surviving the collapse of the communist alliance that bolstered his success.

Kate Stein / WLRN

Thousands of people took to the streets of Miami late Friday with Cuban flags, pots and pans, cafecitos and cigars in reaction to the announcement of the death of Fidel Castro by the Cuban government


Associated Press

This obituary originally ran in Time Magazine. 

Fidel Castro, the world's most revered and reviled revolutionary, has died in Havana at age 90.

Associated Press

Former President Fidel Castro, who led a rebel army to improbable victory in Cuba, embraced Soviet-style communism and defied the power of 10 U.S. presidents during his half century rule, has died at age 90.

With a shaking voice, his younger brother, Raul Castro, announced on state television that his brother died at 10:29 p.m. on Friday night.

Luis Choy / Special to the Miami Herald

Next month marks the second anniversary of normalized relations between the U.S. and Cuba – and things couldn’t look more uncertain. President-elect Donald Trump has pledged to cancel normalization unless Cuba delivers more democratic reform. But even before Trump’s election, Cuba seemed to be closing rather than opening the door to U.S. business.

A Museum 10 Years In The Making Emerges For Cuban Exiles

Nov 18, 2016
Rebekah Entralgo / WLRN

Those who have driven on Coral Way in Miami over the past 10 years may be familiar with a banner across a building that read, "Cuban museum coming soon." Now that museum is finally complete.

Originally founded in 1996 as the "Cuban Museum," the American Museum of the Cuban Diaspora has been undergoing a rebranding process. 

"The name 'Cuban Museum' could mean anything about Cuba," said founding director Ileana Fuentes. "We wanted this museum to be focused on the art of the exiles."

DIMENSIONS DANCE THEATRE OF MIAMI

Robin Thom / Insight Cuba

Last month they ran the Key Biscayne Half Marathon – with a big new prize.

“They said, 'You’re gonna go to Cuba,'" says Elliott Mason, who won the race and gets a paid trip to run in the Havana Marathon this Sunday. “I had no idea that Havana had a marathon.”

But like a growing number of U.S. runners, now that he knows, he wants to get to the starting line.

THE MIAMI HERALD

This week on The Florida Roundup...

Tom Hudson / WLRN.org

When the U.S. and Cuba normalized relations two years ago, hope sprang eternal that Americans could now do business on the island. But we got another reminder this week that it may also require eternal patience.

Last February, President Obama approved plans by an Alabama enterprise to build the first U.S. factory in Cuba in more than half a century.

The U.N. General Assembly votes every year on a resolution calling for an end to the U.S. embargo on Cuba. The U.S. has always opposed the symbolic measure.

But today, U.S. Ambassador to the U.N Samantha Power told the General Assembly that for the first time, the U.S. would abstain.

You might assume that with the thawing of relations between Cuba and the U.S., Cubans would see positive change at home, and less reason to attempt the perilous water crossing to Florida. You'd assume wrong.

U.S. law enforcement authorities are confronting a surge of Cuban migrants trying to make the journey by boat across the Florida Straits; it's the highest numbers they've seen in two decades.

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