Cuba

Associated Press

The U.S. State Department has changed its travel alert system and now recommends American citizens “reconsider” visiting Cuba. It had previously issued a warning advising Americans not to travel to the island.

“As we were putting all this together, we did a very careful assessment. We talked to all of our experts, and this is where we came out on Cuba,” Michelle Bernier-Toth, acting deputy Assistant Secretary for Overseas Citizen Services, said in a teleconference on Wednesday.

J. Scott Applewhite / AP via Miami Herald

COMMENTARY

In February 1996, Cuban fighter jets shot down two small, unarmed civilian airplanes piloted by members of the Cuban exile group Brothers to the Rescue – four of whom were killed.

Cuba argued the Brothers aircraft had violated Cuban airspace. But a U.N. investigation ruled otherwise, and the shootdowns were widely condemned as an unreasonably brutal act.

CubaOne

President Trump last year made it harder for Americans to travel to and do business with Cuba. In response, Cuba is making it easier for at least Cuban-Americans to engage the communist island. 

WLRN/Miami Herald

A lot has happened in the past 365 days.

A Category 4 hurricane plowed across the Florida Keys. President Obama ended the “wet foot, dry foot” policy for Cubans. The death toll related to Florida's opioid epidemic climbed higher. Venezuela sank further into economic and social chaos.

For the last episode of The Florida Roundup in 2017, editorial page editors from the Miami Herald, the Sun Sentinel and the Palm Beach Post — Nancy Ancrum, Rosemary O’Hara and Rick Christie — sat down with WLRN's Tom Hudson to review the year’s biggest news stories. 

Cuban Leader Raúl Castro Will Stay In Power Past February

Dec 21, 2017
AGP/Getty Images via Miami Herald

The Cuban government has announced that it will postpone a historic presidential election in 2018.

Cuban leader Raúl Castro will remain in power at least until April 19, the new date in which a new legislature and the president of the Councils of State and Ministers will be elected.

Castro had announced that he would retire at the end of his two terms on Feb. 24, the original date of the election of the new National Assembly.

Florida officials say the number of Cubans registering for government assistance dropped dramatically after a longstanding migration policy ended in January.

AP via Miami Herald

COMMENTARY

For those of us who favor loosening the screws on Cuba but tightening the screws on Venezuela, this week presents a nagging question: At what point do we become guilty of a double standard?

Venezuela’s regime just made an announcement that should cause some geopolitical navel-gazing in that regard. To wit: the ruling socialists, or Chavistas, said they’re considering not holding presidential elections next year as long as the U.S. keeps its financial sanctions against Venezuela in place.

Associated Press

Doctors treating the U.S. Embassy victims of mysterious, invisible attacks in Cuba have discovered brain abnormalities as they search for clues to explain the hearing, vision, balance and memory damage, The Associated Press has learned.

It's the most specific finding to date about physical damage, showing that whatever it was that harmed the Americans, it led to perceptible changes in their brains. The finding is also one of several factors fueling growing skepticism that some kind of sonic weapon was involved.

Today on Sundial: Carlos Alvarez, known to college football junkies as the “Cuban Comet,” joined us to talk about his arrival to the United States, his love for the game and how he used it as a platform to break racial barriers.

Alvarez and his family arrived in the U.S. in 1960 when Alvarez was 10 years old. In Cuba, his dad attended law school with Fidel Castro and wanted no part of the Cuban communist revolution. When the family arrived in Key West, Alvarez’s dad advised him and his siblings to “become Americans” because they were never going back.

The Acoustic Attacks and Science / Gobierno de Cuba

We still don’t know what or who caused the alleged sonic attacks that injured U.S. diplomats in Havana. Which is why Cuba put its own scientists online this week to debunk the claims.

Some two dozen personnel at the U.S. embassy in Havana say they were victims of acoustic attacks. The high-pitched sonic blasts started last year and caused hearing loss and other illnesses.

Airbnb

Last June, President Donald Trump pledged to make it harder for Americans to visit Cuba and do business with the communist island. On Wednesday his administration released its new Cuba regulations – and ironically, private Cuban entrepreneurs may get hit worst.

Trump's New Restrictions On Financial Transactions, Trade And Travel To Cuba Go In Effect Thursday

Nov 8, 2017
Al Diaz / Miami Herald

The days of Americans legally staying at Ernest Hemingway’s Old Havana haunt, the Hotel Ambos Mundos, or making purchases at Havana’s only luxury shopping arcade, will be over under new regulations the Trump administration issued Wednesday as part of a crackdown on U.S. business and travel to Cuba.

Cuba Policy On Cuban-American Travel To The Island Has Political And Economic Tentacles

Oct 31, 2017
Associated Press

New travel regulations that Cuba announced over the weekend appear designed to make sure a steady flow of Cuban-American visitors continues.

But the rules — which include welcoming back Cubans who fled the island through irregular means, such as by rafts, and eliminating some of the bureaucracy associated with visits by the diaspora — also seem to be a response to a chill in the U.S.-Cuba relationship and a stricter Trump administration policy on travel between the two countries.

Miami Herald

How much was the life of a Cuban communist worth in 1962? Depending on their rank within the party and the government, it could be worth up to a million dollars.

But there was one for which the CIA would only pay two cents: Fidel Castro.

The CIA considered giving rewards to those who murdered informants, officers, foreign communists and members of the Cuban government in a plan called “Operation Bounty,” detailed in one of the 2,800 documents declassified Thursday by the National Archives, related to the investigation into the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.

Courtsey Carla Leon

Before Hurricane Irma ravaged Cuba’s north coast last month, Carla León’s private business – renting her family’s three-bedroom house in Havana through Airbnb – had already begun losing customers thanks to another force of nature: Donald Trump.

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