Cuba

When President Donald Trump came to Little Havana to announce revisions to the United States policy toward Cuba travel, he never mentioned Key West by name. But the Southernmost City was in the speech.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Dominoes. The game is played throughout South Florida and Latin America at parties, in backyards and at parks.

Now, for a few weeks, you can play it in an art gallery in a show with some real Miami flavor.

Pérez Art Museum Miami has a new show called Spots, Dots, Pips and Tiles: An Exhibition About Dominoes, which takes the game as a launch point for art.

Al Diaz / Miami Herald

Note: This story was first broadcasted on Jan. 16, 2017. 

In recent years, a growing number of news and political websites have popped up in Cuba. Some are taking advantage of what they say has been a small but vibrant opening afforded them since former President Obama reestablished U.S. relations with Cuba. But others worry that President Trump's harder line toward the Communist Castro government could have a chilling effect on the independent media movement afoot.

A Woman's Place In Cuba's Boxing Ring

Jun 30, 2017
Jordyn Heck / University of Florida

HAVANA – The fading yellow-green walls are chipping, and someone’s rooster crows loud enough to be heard over the whistles and punches.

The Gimnasio de Boxeo Rafael Trejo in Havana, Cuba, has tall buildings on either side which frame the outdoor practice facility. 

Courtesy of Simone Dinnerstein

An orchestra from Cuba is making its South Florida debut amidst changing relations between it and the U.S.

The Havana Lyceum Orchestra is on its first tour throughout the U.S. and will be performing Friday at the New World Center in Miami Beach.

The orchestra is one of the country’s most prominent classical music groups composed of conservatory students, graduates and music teachers.

With about half of the members of the orchestra, violinist Maiin Hau has been touring the east coast: New York, Philadelphia, Boston, now Miami Beach.

Sebastian Ballestas / Miami Herald

COMMENTARY

President Trump's speech in Little Havana last Friday wasn’t about remaking America’s Cuba policy. It was about reliving the Cuban-American past.

It was an exile Woodstock reunion, a nostalgic return to a time when Miami Cubans (and their impressive voter turnout) convinced Washington to isolate communist Cuba. Back to the years when they tightened the economic and diplomatic screws until the head slots stripped – certain it would drive the Castro dictatorship from their mother island.

Roberto Koltun / Miami Herald

President Trump’s Cuba speech in Miami last Friday offered chest-thumping, cold-war nostalgia sound-bites like:

“Now we hold the cards.”

“We challenge Cuba to come to the table with a new agreement.”

Al Diaz / Miami Herald

President Trump brought a fiery taste of the Cold War back to Miami today when he announced his new Cuba policy. But is his Cuba crackdown likely to leverage the democratic changes he promised?

Trump Rolls Back 'Completely One-Sided' Cuba Policy

Jun 16, 2017
Al Diaz / Miami Herald

President Donald Trump Friday announced new restrictions on travel and business with Cuba, reversing some of the relaxed new relations instituted two years ago by President Barack Obama.

Ladyrene Perez / Cubadebate via AP

HAVANA — Cuba is starting an electoral process that is expected to end with President Raul Castro stepping down in February.

The Council of State says in Wednesday's state media that voting for municipal assemblies will take place on Oct. 22. It doesn't set the date of voting for the country's parliament, which selects the Council of State and the president. Elections are held every five years.

Castro has said he'll step down as president in February, although he is expected to remain head of the ruling Communist Party.

Al Diaz / Miami Herald

President Trump will be in Miami Friday to unveil his new Cuba policy, which will reverse some of his predecessor’s normalization measures. The main targets are Cuba’s military – and wannabe American tourists.

Andrew Harnik / AP via Miami Herald

COMMENTARY

I don’t usually feel sorry for Central American heads of state. Too many of them, right-wing or left-wing, have done their damnedest to perpetuate the image of the corrupt, tin-pot strongman.

At first glance, it might seem like an old Midwest steel town like Cleveland wouldn’t have much in common with a tropical island capital like Cuba’s Havana. But, a group of urban designers from both cities are finding that they share some problems and can help each other find solutions.

David C. Barnett (@DCBstream) from Here & Now contributor WCPN ideastream reports.

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