coral

At a time when the Great Barrier Reef and other coral reefs are facing unprecedented destruction, researchers in Australia have found a small ray of hope for the fish that make the reefs their home.

Fish are more resilient to the effects of ocean acidification than scientists had previously thought, according to research published Thursday in Scientific Reports.

Rudiger Bieler, The Field Museum

A sea snail with spider-like abilities.  Sounds like a sci-fi movie monster.

But the creature recently discovered in the Florida Keys is causing some very real anxiety for scientists worried that it could become a particularly troublesome exotic invader.

Wilfredo Lee / AP via Miami Herald

Congress passed the Water Resources Development Act on Wednesday -- and that could be a dual victory for South Florida. The act authorizes the Central Everglades Planning Project, which is slated to provide about $2 billion dollars for various ecosystem restoration efforts. And, it supports a $320 million dollar Port Everglades expansion that’s intended to help larger, heavier ships navigate the area.

 

Port Everglades / Courtesy

Fears of irreparable harm to coral reefs prompted a lawsuit Wednesday against the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Four groups are asking the Corps to re-evaluate the Port Everglades dredging project in Broward County. They say the Corps has failed to consider the disastrous effects of a similar dredging project on coral reefs at PortMiami. In that project, large amounts of coral were damaged or killed by sediment.

Florida's Coral Getting Help From Hundreds Of Miles Away

Mar 4, 2016
James St. John / Wikimedia Commons

Some coral in the Florida Keys are breeding with coral 1,000 miles away more than they are with coral on the very same reef, according to a new study from the University of Miami.

New research about sunscreen's damaging effects on coral reefs suggests that you might want to think twice before slathering it on.

Jenny Staletovich / Miami Herald Staff

As the oceans absorb more carbon on a planet increasingly choked by greenhouse gases, scientists worry its reefs — the great storm-deflecting rampart for much of the tropics — will crumble and fall.