confederacy

Updated at 7:30 p.m. ET

A towering statue of Gen. Robert E. Lee no longer stands over the city of New Orleans.

After years of legal wrangling and intimidation, New Orleans has begun the process of dismantling four monuments of the Confederate and Jim Crow eras.

The first monument, which honors members of a white supremacist paramilitary group who fought against the city's racially integrated, Reconstruction-era police force in 1874, was dismantled and removed before the sun rose Monday.

Following death threats, the contractors wore flak jackets and helmets as they broke down the Battle of Liberty Place monument, as WWNO's Tegan Wendland reports.

Courtesy of Sun Sentinel

 

Tension is mounting in Hollywood Florida over Forrest Street-a street named for Nathan Bedford Forrest, a Confederate general and a founder of the Ku Klux Klan.

The split in the community has commissioners asking the city's African American advisory council to help make the call on changing the street name.

The council agreed Tuesday night that Hollywood should not only rename Forrest Street, but also noted two other roadways named for Confederate generals: Lee, named for General Robert E. Lee, and Hood, named for John Bell Hood.

Florida may replace the statue of a Confederate general at the U.S. Capitol.

A Florida House panel on Wednesday endorsed a bill calling for removal of the bronze statue of Gen. Edmund Kirby Smith from the Capitol where every state is allowed to have two statues.

The bill sponsored by Miami Republican Rep. Jose Felix Diaz would start the process of selecting a sculptor and the name of a prominent Floridian citizen to replace Smith. The Florida Legislature would have to approve the replacement statue in 2017.