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Community Contributor
8:37 am
Wed May 22, 2013

A Miami Native Who Remained Local Pens A Poem On Her Dying Breed

We’ve asked a few of the authors of standout poems for our That’s So Miami project to explain the inspiration behind their work. Find the winners of our contest and more entries here.

  I’m from Miami

Can you say that?

Not many can

Some came by raft

The water’s warm

The people mostly cold

By wearing limited clothes

They can be very bold

English often coming

after Spanish, spoken first

Even Creole is common

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Community Contributor
9:11 am
Mon May 20, 2013

Miami's Acceptance Of Syrian Immigrant Inspires Verse

We’ve asked a few of the authors of standout poems for our That’s So Miami project to explain the inspiration behind their work. Find the winners of our contest and more entries here.

Black and white

Chinese and Cuban

Who would’ve thought

My bestfriend would be Russian?

That’s so Miami.

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Miami Stories Project
8:10 am
Fri May 17, 2013

After Bay Of Pigs And Pedro Pan Campground, Cuban Exiles Build Family In Miami

Credit Wikipedia Commons

Our family came from Havana, a beautiful city that some have called a tropical paradise.

My brothers and I came to Miami on a Pan American flight and were taken to a campground that the Pedro Pan organizers had set up in Kendall, near where Town & Country Mall now stands. We were there for about two weeks before being sent to Albuquerque, N.M., where we were taken in by the family of Dr. Eugene Purtell.
 

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Community Contributor
8:46 am
Mon May 13, 2013

Miami Theater Center Redefines Itself With "Inanna and the Huluppu Tree"

Miami Theater Center spreads its wings with a performance of “Inanna and the Huluppu Tree."
Credit Pavel Antonov

The Miami Theater Center is growing. IFrom the annual contemporary performance SandBox Series to being the new home for Mad Cat Theater Company, MTC has redefined itself as a vibrant center of culture in sleepy Miami Shores.

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Community Contributor
8:04 am
Mon May 13, 2013

South Beach’s “Colorful Mélange” Inspires Poem, Green Sequins Included

We’ve asked a few of the authors of standout poems for our That’s So Miami project to explain the inspiration behind their work. Find the winners of our contest and more entries here.

Green sequin bikini.

Purple hair and skinny.

Red lipped.

Boob equipped.

Blue high heeled kid.

I saw it, I did.

Thats so Miami.

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Community Contributor
2:21 pm
Mon May 6, 2013

Early Miami Pioneer Recalls Early Days Of South Florida

Flagler Street in downtown Miami in 1935.

  I was born Martha Anne Peters in Victoria Hospital on Dec. 20, 1937, a second generation native-born Miamian.

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Community Contributor
8:45 am
Wed May 1, 2013

A Cancer Patient’s Quest For Purpose And The Pacific Ocean

Menasche: “I understood cancer would take my future as soon as I was diagnosed, but I didn’t understand it would take my past.”
Credit Photo provided

David Menasche is a light packer. Four days of clothes, basic toiletries, a voice recorder, a laptop and a cell phone are all he needs. Oh, and his red-tipped cane, to help him navigate now that he is almost completely blind.

His quest is heavy on purpose and light on itinerary. His goal: to see the Pacific Ocean before his vision is completely lost, and to visit as many of his former students as possible along the way.

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Community Contributor
8:26 am
Tue April 30, 2013

Sandy Hook Made All Schools Feel Unsafe, But Arming Teachers Isn’t The Answer, Mom Says

The Sandy Hook Elementary School memorial in Newtown, Conn.
Credit Wikipedia Commons

 

I will never forget that awful December day. My daughter left to school and I turned on the TV. I stumbled upon something that read “School Shooting.” All I could think was that my little princess was at her school and that this could happen anywhere. As it was getting time to pick her up, I rushed a little more and could not wait to hear her voice and see her smile. As soon as I saw her, I felt an immense sense of relief and peace. Tears kept on coming down my face.

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Community Contributor
8:27 am
Mon April 29, 2013

Desegregation Pioneer Recalls School Integration In Miami

A woman escorts her two daughters to Orchid Villa School in Miami during desegregation.

I was born in Nashville and spent the first four years of my life in Tuskegee, Ala.

My father, Dr. John O. Brown Sr., moved to Miami in 1955 to begin his practice in ophthalmology. To this day, I'm glad he did.

We had neighbors who were white and black. Our next-door neighbor was an older white lady who inspired my mother's love for growing orchids and my brother's passion for collecting butterflies.

I attended schools -- Jackson's Toddle Inn and Floral Heights -- that were all black. I remember those as happy years.

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Community Contributor
8:39 am
Fri April 26, 2013

Miami Must Move Toward More Open Spaces As The Metro Area Grows

A New World Symphony "wallcast" concert.
Credit Rui Dias-Aidos

I spent a recent night watching a performance of the New World Symphony being broadcast on a wall at the New World Center. As the symphony performed inside, the video played simultaneously on a soaring, 7,000-square-foot projection wall on the building’s façade. It was a dazzling night, with hundreds of people speaking multiple languages gathered on blankets and chairs, toting picnic baskets, children and pets.

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Community Contributor
8:41 am
Wed April 24, 2013

Daniel Lewis Miami Dance Sampler Covers The World Of Dance, In Eight Minutes Or Less

Niura Marquez/Nu Flamenco Collaborative’s “La Nina de mis Ojos.”

The Daniel Lewis Miami Dance Sampler was a mixed bag of performances that introduced audiences to contemporary dance, ballet, new flamenco and traditional African dance forms. The performances, billed as six- to eight-minute samplers, highlighted the scope of dance talent that exists in Miami. Produced by Dance NOW! Miami and Miami Dance Futures, the goal of the sampler is to give local talent exposure and to expose audiences to dance forms that they wouldn’t normally seek out.

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Community Contributor
8:36 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Retired Teacher Says Armed Educators Will Keep Children Safe

Retired teacher Evelyn Stahl says arming teachers will help prevent school shootings.
Credit Photo provided

When a mentally ill person entered a Connecticut school and slaughtered children and teachers, it was the last straw for some people. In this ultra liberal, politically correct climate in which we find ourselves today, the immediate outcry was to ban this and ban that. The very thought that teachers should not have the right to defend themselves and their pupils is laughable.

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Community Contributor
8:02 am
Fri April 19, 2013

Five Centuries Later, Florida Remembers Ponce de León's Tumultuous Arrival

Juan Ponce de León came to Florida searching for the Bahamas, not the fountain of youth.
Credit Photo via the Granger Collection, N.Y., and Visit Florida

Juan Ponce de León served as governor of Puerto Rico for a tumultuous five years. During that time, the native Taínos tried unsuccessfully to overpower him, but, in the end, it was the son of Christopher Columbus who unseated him during a political struggle for power in the New World. Ponce de León’s new “asiento,” or assignment, from Spain’s King Ferdinand II was to set sail and find – not the fountain of youth, as is widely thought – but the island of “Benimy.” After being at sea for nearly a month, he finally sighted land, but it wasn’t Bimini.

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Community Contributor
8:03 am
Wed April 17, 2013

Hospital Gun Scare Taught Doctor About Need To Be Armed

In the mid ‘70s, I had recently left the Army and started working as an emergency physician at a hospital in Huntsville, Alabama. It was a Wednesday, church night, and I was working the evening shift.

A woman in her thirties was brought in with a bullet wound in her leg. She told us that her boy friend had shot her during an argument. The wound didn't look serious; bleeding was minimal. It appeared to have been caused by a 32- or 38-caliber hand gun. I placed her in a room, ordered an X-ray, and sat at the physician desk to write up the chart.

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Community Contributor
8:01 am
Mon April 15, 2013

Close Call At Hairy Intersection Shows Need For Bicycle Education

Bike riders head north on Biscayne in 1940. Things have gotten tougher since then for bicyclists.

One particular evening will always stick with me. I was commuting home from work and at the intersection of U.S. 1 and Southwest 27th Avenue, which is a pretty intense during evening rush hour.

As I crossed the intersection, I was cut off by a driver who was clearly unaware of my presence, despite the bike lane. The car came within inches of my bike. Being familiar with this intersection, I know when and where I need to be watching. Had I not known where to look, I would not have been able to break in time.

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