Colombia

In the southern Colombian jungle town of San José del Guaviare, construction workers repair a beer warehouse that was partially destroyed by a bomb. There are shrapnel holes in the ceiling and a small crater in the sidewalk out front.

The attack came last month after warehouse manager Javier Montoya refused to hand over large sums of cash to a small group of dissident FARC rebels.

"I'm confused," Montoya says. "I never thought this would happen during a peace process."

I’m looking at a photograph of a shoreline on the wall at the opening reception of "Potente" through my smartphone.

Four little white dots converge in the center and all of a sudden the water begins to crash on the rocks.

How did this happen? For answers I spoke with Felipe Aguilar, creator of "Potente," the installation currently being shown at the Colombian consulate in Coral Gables.

Aguilar, a native of Bogota, Colombia, is a graduate of the University of Miami with a degree in filmmaking.

Pedro Portal / Miami Herald

Last fall Colombia was being called “the Brexit of the Americas.” That’s because, in stunning Brexit fashion, voters there had just rejected a peace agreement to end the country’s half-century-long civil war. Most Colombians felt the accord was too lenient toward the Marxist guerrillas known as the FARC.

Fernando Vergara / AP

The Colombian government has set up several bank accounts to accept donations to help victims of the devastating avalanche that has claimed more than 260 lives in southern Colombia.

The disaster in the small city of Mocoa is considered one of the worst natural tragedies in the nation’s history.

A statement posted on the Consulate of Colombia in Miami website says that the best way to help from outside the country is by depositing directly into a Citibank account, which is serving as an intermediary bank.

Two days after landslides and floods tore through the town of Mocoa, Colombia, and killed more than 200 people, rescuers were desperately searching for survivors in the mud and rubble.

The "sudden avalanche of mud and water" struck on Friday night, as people were sleeping, as NPR reported over the weekend.

The death toll includes at least 43 children, John Otis reports for NPR.

After pushing a revised peace deal with the FARC rebels through Congress, Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos got down to a far bigger challenge Thursday: implementing it.

The lower house's unanimous vote in favor of the deal Wednesday night set off a countdown to end a conflict that has burned for over half a century and killed more than 260,000 people.

"What comes now is the implementation of this accord ... We face an enormous challenge," Interior Minister Juan Fernando Cristo told a news conference.

Shortly before a charter jet carrying a Brazilian soccer team crashed in the mountains of Colombia, the pilot told air traffic control he was "out of fuel" and experiencing "total electrical failure," according to leaked audio and accounts from a survivor and another pilot.

C
Luis Gallo

The first thing you notice is the restaurants.

Gustavo Cruz, a Venezuelan who runs a restaurant with his father in the Colombian capital Bogotá, says there’s a boom of Venezuelan areperas in the city.

Areperas are the folks who make and sell arepas, corn flatbreads popular in both Colombia and Venezuela, but prepared differently in each country.

And now Bogotá is awash in Venezuelan areperas — a testament to the recent influx of Venezuelan migrants and their visibility in the city’s public life.

A plane carrying a Brazilian professional soccer team crashed in the mountains near Medellín, Colombia, late Monday, killing 71 people.

Five people survived the crash of the charter plane, according to authorities. Officials initially reported that the plane was carrying 81 people and that, variously, 75 or 76 of them had died.

"The British Aerospace 146 aircraft was carrying Brazil's Chapecoense soccer team to a tournament in Medellín, Colombia's second-largest city," John Otis reports for NPR from the Colombian capital, Bogotá.

Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos and Rodrigo Londono, the leader of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia or FARC, signed a new peace agreement Thursday, despite lingering opposition to the deal.

Neither at war nor fully at peace, Marxist rebels in southern Colombia who want to lay down their weapons are instead killing time and contemplating whether they will be called back into combat.

It's a surreal state of affairs, brought on by a stalemate over an agreement to end Colombia's 52-year-old guerrilla war. The accord was signed last month but then rejected by Colombian voters in a binding referendum on Oct. 2. Now, the entire peace process is on hold, leaving thousands of guerrillas in limbo.

Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos has extended a cease-fire with the Marxist FARC rebels until Dec. 31, as he tries to salvage a peace deal that was narrowly rejected in a nationwide referendum.

The agreement was intended to end the guerrilla war that has dragged on for more than 50 years and killed more than 220,000 people, as John Otis reports for NPR from Bogota. He adds:

"After four years of negotiations, the Colombian government and the rebel group known as the FARC last month signed a peace agreement.

Juan Manuel Santos, the president of Colombia, was awarded this year's Nobel Peace Prize for his "resolute efforts to bring the country's more than 50-year-long civil war to an end."

The surprise announcement comes less than a week after Colombian voters delivered a shocking blow to the peace process, and the award notably excludes any leaders of the FARC guerilla group, the other side of the negotiating table.

The Colombian government and the FARC rebel group have spent four years negotiating a peace deal to bring an end to more than 50 years of war.

Terms were agreed on, a deal was finalized, the accord was signed — and then, in a stunning turn of events, the people of Colombia voted against the agreement in a national referendum Sunday.

So. What now?

Associated Press

War or peace?

Those stark options faced Colombians on Sunday — and, by a margin of less than 1 percentage point, Colombians voted to remain at war. In a referendum that aimed to end Latin America's longest guerrilla conflict, voters rejected a peace agreement that would have disarmed the Marxist rebel group known as the FARC. The conflict, which began in the 1960s, has killed more than 200,000 people.

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