college football

Today on Sundial: Carlos Alvarez, known to college football junkies as the “Cuban Comet,” joined us to talk about his arrival to the United States, his love for the game and how he used it as a platform to break racial barriers.

Alvarez and his family arrived in the U.S. in 1960 when Alvarez was 10 years old. In Cuba, his dad attended law school with Fidel Castro and wanted no part of the Cuban communist revolution. When the family arrived in Key West, Alvarez’s dad advised him and his siblings to “become Americans” because they were never going back.

Two of college football's star running backs, Stanford's Christian McCaffrey and LSU's Leonard Fournette, have said they won't play in their respective bowl games, decisions that have prompted some debate in the football world.

FSU Scores Big On National Signing Day

Feb 5, 2016
Jason Getz / USA TODAY Sports

Florida State University is no stranger to collegiate athletic success. The school's football program took advantage of its past success to recruit some of the best high school players of 2016, based on commitments announced on Wednesday, National Signing Day.

 

FSU had a busy day to say the least, rounding up a total of 25 players: one 1 5-star player, 17 4-star players and seven 3-star players.

 

 

Peter Diana / Post-Gazette

Sunshine State residents can now relish Florida's distinction in being  the No.1 U.S. state in producing  NFL players.

Florida edged California by one player this season. Florida had 204 players, while California had 203 on NFL kickoff weekend rosters. Only four states had more than 100 players. Texas was third with 181, followed by Georgia with 114, according to the annual count by USA football.

Matthew Emmons / USA Today Sports

What does success in collegiate sports mean for a school? Aside from students and alumni basking in glory, success in collegial athletics affects a school in a variety of ways.

Intercollegiate sports have experienced a vast growth in popularity over several decades. According to the football foundation, football attendance has doubled since 1952.

University of Miami alumnus Julian Perez says, “Since a young kid I always watched UM. It had a large presence in my youth;  it still does.”

C.W. Griffin / Miami Herald Staff

Maybe you're a college football fan. If you are, regardless of your team loyalty, you understand all that goes with fandom: the ecstasy of winning, the despair of losing and everything in between. You own a T-shirt or jersey or cap, at the least. You may even go as far as painting your face, maybe your whole body, to the games.

@brickellinfo/flickr

Florida is hosting eight of the 38 postseason games in college football – more than any other state. 

This season’s games will bring football fans from 15 out-of-state schools. State and local governments will get an economic boost as those fans flood theme parks, beaches and other attractions.

Florida Atlantic University

Florida Atlantic University just got the biggest grant in the school's history to build a new athletics facility to help its football team grow.

The new building, which will be called The Complex, will have a sports medicine center, a history and tradition hall, an academic center nearby and an indoor practice field.

The Schmidt Family Foundation is giving an initial $16 million to build The Complex.

Al Diaz / Miami Herald Staff

The University of Miami Hurricanes have had trouble filling Sun Life Stadium in the past. It is far away from campus, and attendance often does not fill even the lower bowl. So the marketing team at the athletics department tried something a little unconventional: They created an ad calling on fans to "GO TO FEWER GAMES."

www.samuelfreedman.com

If college football,  desegregation and civil rights sound like an unlikely triple option play to you, it certainly didn’t to Samuel G. Freedman.

Freedman has written the book Breaking the Line, which lays out a both tumultuous and triumphant time, when college football became the catalyst for integrating both the sport and the colleges themselves.

The year was 1967, when Florida A&M University and Grambling College of Louisiana played for what was known as the black college championship.