classic film

A. Sorondo

With so many on-demand options available to film lovers (Netflix and Amazon Prime, to name a few), why do so many people still go to movie theaters?

Alexander Sorondo might have part of the answer.

There's a classic moment in the romantic thriller Charade, when Audrey Hepburn says to Cary Grant in exasperation, "Do you know what's the matter with you? ... Nothing."

For decades, the whole world felt the same. Grant's unrivaled blend of charm, good looks and silliness — he hadn't a shred of pomposity or elitism — made him a movie star everyone loved. Everyone, that is, except Archie Leach, the actor's real-life self who wrote that he'd spent years cautiously peering from behind the face of a man known as Cary Grant.

DeWolfe and Wood Collection / Monroe County Public Library

  Sixty years ago, a film partially shot in Key West won three Academy Awards — including Best Actress.

  Anna Magnani was the first Italian actress to win an Oscar. She won for her role in "The Rose Tattoo," a movie based on the play by her close friend Tennessee Williams.

The house where Magnani's character lived has recently been restored by an Italian couple. Carla Agostini Gay is a major movie buff and Magnani is her favorite actress.

Credit O Cinema

There were no steadicams in 1964, no lightweight cameras or drone-cams.  Perhaps that's why film lovers watching “Soy Cuba” for the first time get understandably excited by what has become known as the “hotel shot.”   At the start of the film, a camera pans across the upper decks of a Havana hotel during a beauty contest, then descends straight down to the pool level as if held by ghostly hands.  The camera pans across bathing beauties basking in lounge chairs, then actually goes underwater in the hotel pool.