City of Miami

Owen Byrne / Flickr Creative Commons

Miami city commissioners are trying to figure out a citywide anti-poverty plan and how they would fund the program.

Two months ago, at the urging of Commissioner Keon Hardemon, the city set aside $1.2 million into a poverty trust during its budget process. Hardemon represents the most impoverished district in the city which includes Overtown, Liberty City and Little Haiti.

On Friday morning, Hardemon, Commisioners Francis Suarez and Marc Sarnoff and about a dozen city staff members took part in a roundtable discussion about an anti-poverty strategy.

Nadege Green / WLRN

Hermana Richardson is returning to the Liberty City street where her son and his best friend were murdered.

It’s been three months since one of the worst mass shooting in Miami’s history. Seven people were injured. Two died.

“Three months they’ve been murdered and we haven’t heard anything yet,” says Richardson.  “They’re not talking about it anymore and I don’t want it to be thrown on a shelf.”

Nadege Green / WLRN

Sheila McNeil says she still holds hope that the Miami police officer who killed her unarmed son three years ago will one day be held accountable.

Prosecutors cleared Officer Reynaldo Goyos, who believed Travis McNeil was reaching for a gun when he shot him during a traffic stop. Goyos was fired in 2013, only to be reinstated with back-pay. But there’s one agency left with an open case: Miami’s Civilian Investigative Panel, which reviews cases of alleged police misconduct.

The independent watchdog has yet to close its inquiry — nearly two years past its own deadline.

 Today on WLRN-Miami Herald News, you heard:   

Wynwood Fights Parking Regulations

Aug 13, 2014
Lisann Ramos / WLRN

The Miami Parking Authority is implementing meters throughout Wynwood, and the meters are meeting resistance from businesses in the area.

Representatives from the Miami Parking Authority were in attendance at the Wynwood Arts District Association meeting Tuesday evening.

Today on WLRN-Miami Herald News, you heard:

“Viaje One Way” is a Spanish-language anthology of authors from Latin America and Spain. Hernan Vera Alvarez, one of the editors, says the book is "a mirror of the 21st-Century Miami."

"Before there were anthologies of Cuban writers in Miami," he says, "but this book is the first one that unites Latin American, Spanish and Cuban writers."

Alvarez moved to the U.S. from Argentina when he was 23 years old. Below, he talks about the new "Viaje One Way."

Creative Commons / Flickr user Okko Pyykkö

Miami’s Civilian Investigative Panel is in charge of policing the police, but the 12-year-old agency is having internal problems. The panel is in charge of reviewing the Miami Police Department's use of force, especially in cases of high-profile police shootings.

Commission Votes To Keep Ultra In Miami

Apr 24, 2014
youredm.com

 

Ultra's not going anywhere. On Thursday the Miami City Commission voted to retain the music festival.

After two hours of discussion, the commission ultimately showed their support for Ultra in a four-to-one vote. Opposition of the festival came from Commissioner Marc Sarnoff, who no longer wants Ultra to take place in downtown Miami. 

 

He cited weaknesses in security that have allowed those without tickets to jump the fence and acts of violence as a result of drug use at the festival. 

 

Enmanuel/Flickr http://bit.ly/1eeBsYU

The numbers are in. The estimated cost of building a light rail line from mainland Miami to the beach is $532 million. And three key players are lining up in support of the proposal.

The mayors of Miami-Dade County, the city of Miami and the city of Miami Beach are backing the proposal to build a light rail line along the MacArthur Causeway.

Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Gimenez has said previously that if traffic between Miami and Miami Beach gets worse it will kill the tourism industry.

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