Canoe Project

Florida State Archives.

Terence Cantarella launches on his four day Canoe Project exploration on Monday morning from near NE 69th St. and Biscayne Blvd. in Miami.

Photos Of Day One Of The Canoe Project

Mar 18, 2013
Terence Cantarella

Take a look at some of the stunning photos taken by Terence Cantarella as he canoes through Miami-Dade county’s canals this week. Terence is the man behind the Canoe Project here at WLRN.

The Canoe Project is an effort to shed some light on the unrecognized backdrop to our lives here in Miami-Dade: our city’s vast network of canals. These waterways completely surround us, yet, many of us don’t know where they go or why they are there.

Jim Mullin

Sean Rowe was hired by Miami New Times in June 1990 by Jim Mullin.  Rowe was the first person we know of who circumnavigated Miami’s canals. We asked Mullin, who is now the publisher and editor of Biscayne Times, what it was like to be his editor on this project over two decades ago.

Q: How did you first learn about Sean’s plan and what was your initial reaction?

Photos: Day Three Of The Canoe Project

Mar 18, 2013
Terence Cantarella

Here are some great photos taken by Terence Cantarella on the third day of his journey as he paddles through Miami-Dade’s canals.  On day three of his journey, Terence canoed down the Miami River where cargo ships surrounded him. He also made his way through Blue Lagoon on his way to Coral Gables. Terence will eventually end his trip today near Coconut Grove.  Be sure to join us in celebrating the end of Terence’s journey today at Scotty’s Landing in the Grove this evening at 6 p.m.

Terence Cantarella, the man behind the the Canoe Project here at WLRN, had a chat with The Miami Herald‘s Michael Alen this week about waking up at day break, not sleeping well, and other aspects of spending four days straight in a canoe.

The Canoe Project was an idea of Terence’s to shed some light on the unrecognized backdrop to our lives here in Miami-Dade: our city’s vast network of canals.

Jose A. Iglesias for El Nuevo Herald

Earlier this week WLRN Miami Herald’s Dan Grech interviewed Terence Cantarella, an intrepid contributor to WLRN who had the idea of navigating his way around Miami through its canal system in a canoe.

His proposed four-day journey became the Canoe Project: an effort to shed some light on the unrecognized backdrop to our lives here in Miami-Dade: our city’s vast network of canals. These waterways completely surround us, yet, many of us don’t know where they go or why they are there.

David Samayoa

Terence Cantarella, the man behind the Canoe Project, completed his four-day journey yesterday as he paddled into Scotty’s Landing in Coconut Grove.

The project was an effort to shed some light on the unrecognized backdrop to our lives here in Miami-Dade: our city’s vast network of canals. These waterways completely surround us, yet, many of us don’t know where they go or why they are there.

Be sure you continue to check out the site, though. We will report on our continued canal explorations– and Thursday, April 28, Under the Sun airs Terence’s reflections on the trip.

Photos Of The Last Day Of The Canoe Project

Mar 18, 2013
Kenny Malone

Terence Cantarella shared photos of the final leg of his four-day journey through Miami-Dade’s canals.  Yesterday, Terence made his way through Coral Gables and eventually paddled is way to Scotty’s Landing on the water in Coconut Grove, where the WLRN staff celebrated his return to dry land.

The Department of Commerce Collection

In an effort to add some perspective and history to WLRN’s Canoe Project, we’re also taking a look at books that add to our conversation about Miami-Dade’s canals.

The Canoe Project was a four-day long journey through Miami’s canals and waterways via canoe.

The Art Of Life Within Miami’s Waterways

Mar 18, 2013
Coral Morphologic

Part of the Canoe Project’s mission is to create a conversation, and ultimately some new understanding, of the nature of Miami-Dade’s vast network of waterways.

Contributing to this conversation today is Colin Foord, one of the brilliant marine biologists/artists behind Coral Morphologic, which is described as a “coral aquaculture laboratory and multi-media aquarium studio” here in Miami.

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