cancer

On an afternoon a few weeks ago, Faithe Craig noticed that her temperature had spiked to just above 100 degrees F. For most people, the change might not be cause for alarm, but Craig is being treated for stage 3 breast cancer, and any temperature change could signal a serious problem.

She called her nurse at the hospital clinic where she gets care, at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, who told her to come in immediately for cancer urgent-care services at the hospital's hematology oncology clinic.

An influential federal task force is relaxing its controversial opposition to routine screening for prostate cancer.

In the proposed revised guidelines released Tuesday, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force says men ages 55 to 69 should decide individually with their doctors whether and when to undergo prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing.

Chemotherapy remains one of the mainstays of cancer treatment, but these harsh drugs are slowly being edged aside in medical research, as new treatments, like immunotherapy, grab the spotlight.

Still, this is not the end of the road for chemotherapy. For one thing, doctors are coming to realize that some of these drugs are useful for more than just killing cancer cells.

A campaign is currently underway in Florida to educate parents about a childhood vaccine that can prevent cancers associated with the sexually-transmitted human papillomavirus, or HPV, in adulthood.

How do you get women who never talk about breast cancer to start opening up?

That was the question on the mind of Usman Saleemi, who along with colleagues Tiya Fazelbhoy and Jaison Ben created a bra designed to encourage breast self-examination among women in Pakistan.

According to Pink Ribbon, a national breast cancer charity based in Lahore, Pakistan has the highest incidence of breast cancer in Asia. More than 40,000 women lose their lives to the disease each year.

Women are less likely to die of breast cancer than they were a decade ago, but not all women are benefiting from that trend.

White women saw more of a drop in death rates than black women — 1.9 percent a year from 2010 to 2014, compared to a 1.5 percent decrease for black women, according to a report published Thursday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

There may be plenty of room for debate about whether some aspects of everyday life cause cancer — whether it’s drinking too much coffee, eating too much sugar or talking too much on a cell phone.

Baptist Health

A machine that blasts beams to fight evil cancer cells may sound more like a comic book and less of a reality.

But last week, Baptist Hospital in Kendall began installing this new medical equipment to provide an alternative to X-ray radiation for cancer patients.  

The 220-ton machine is known as  a cyclotron, but Baptist Hospital calls its newest addition “Proton Pete.” 

Men who live near the Daytona International Speedway  have higher death rates than state averages, according to an analysis of health statistics from the Florida Department of Health.

Colon cancer rates are 10 times higher than the state average in the area code surrounding the speedway, and stroke rates are almost 13 times higher.

Miami Blog Helps Women Embrace Their Cancer Scars

Apr 28, 2015
Leslie Lyn / Wear To Now

A Miami-based blog is featuring fashion shoots with women who have battled cancer. It’s called Wear To Now. The women get photo shoots with professional hair, makeup and styling for free. The blog is trying to help women embrace their scars.

Lori Cuellar posed for the camera at Matheson Hammock Park. The morning sun was hitting her. Biscayne Bay and the Miami skyline were in the background.

Canine Cancer: When A Dog Receives Chemotherapy

Oct 28, 2014
Kelley Mitchell

Editor's note: This post follows WLRN's Kelley Mitchell's experience of taking her dog to the animal oncologist. Read the first post, When Cancer Comes Calling: The Canine Kind.

Oscar, my 9-year-old Pembroke Welsh Corgi, loves to go to the vet. His Corgi brother Felix not so much.

When Cancer Comes Calling: The Canine Kind

Oct 24, 2014
Kelley Mitchell

I'm not sure I really "battled" breast cancer back in 2002, as much as it battled me. But after a year of two chemotherapies, radiation and surgery, cancer and I agreed to a draw. We went back to our respective corners, both tired of this fight.

You always wonder when cancer will come back. And for me, so far -- and knock on wood or formica or perhaps a granite kitchen countertop -- it hasn't.

Yet, in a way I never expected, it has.

Patrick Farrell / Miami Herald staff

  In Gov. Rick Scott's budget, the Legislature approved $60 million of annual funding for three cancer centers in Florida. One of the centers, the Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami School of Medicine, will receive $16 million per year for five years.

Even before the funding the center made investments including hiring new physicians and researchers, and purchasing new equipment.

As Dr. Stephen Nimer says, the new personnel and machines help make the center "world class."

MIAMI HERALD

*David passed away on 11/20/14: Post by The Priority List.*

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