Broward County

CREATIVE COMMONS

This week on The Florida Roundup ...

The state finds itself as a defendant in one lawsuit as well as in another soon-to-come lawsuit. 

We're joined by the Miami Herald's Mary Ellen Klas and Gary Fineout with the Associated Press to discuss a week of legal action in Florida. 

A Lee County circuit court judge said the state agriculture department needs to repay local residents for destroyed citrus trees, or explain why it refuses to pay. The Florida Department of Agriculture has less than 40 days to respond.

Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission / FLICKR

It can be hard to avoid lawn mowers, bulldozers and curious dogs if you spend a lot of time in a hole in the ground. 

That's the habitat of the Florida burrowing owl, which as of January is officially classified as a threatened species. 

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) held a meeting in Lauderhill on Thursday to get public input on how to create new development guidelines to protect the owls in light of their new status.

Carron Case / WLRN

Twenty-six years ago, Debra Lombard gave a hand to a friend who needed help teaching a theater class to children with special needs. The experience changed her life forever and marked the beginning of the Exceptional Theater Company (ETC). 

Broward County schools will soon launch a challenge to a new state education law that steers more local dollars to charter schools and  the head of the state teachers union believe more lawsuits will soon follow.

https://www.instagram.com/guardiansecurity/?hl=en

UPDATED: Tuesday, June 6, 2017 at 2:20 PM

Gov. Rick Scott has vetoed a part of the state budget that would’ve compensated residents in Lee and Broward Counties years after the state removed their healthy citrus trees. The 16-year battle for reimbursement continues.

Johanne Rahaman / blackflorida.org

Regina McNish knows her grandma – Lauderhill resident Dorrisile Dervis – by another name.

“Gran Dor,” said McNish. “‘Gran’ is ‘grandma’ in Creole. And ‘Dor’ is the first three letters of her name: Dorrisile.”

And Gran Dor is grand indeed. Born on Christmas Day in 1901, Gran Dor is 115 years old. That makes her the oldest living person in the United States.

Maybe.

The problem is … her family never had Gran Dor’s birth certificate. She was born poor in rural northwest Haiti at the turn of the 20th century. McNish says Gran Dor was probably never registered.

npr.org

Broward County has the largest Jewish community in Florida and the eighth largest in the country.

But a new demographic study shows a decline in that community in the last 20 years. 

And other findings suggest that Broward's Jewish leaders need to reach out to more Jews from Spanish-speaking countries --  if they want their synagogues to survive.

 

Kate Stein / WLRN

Officials from four South Florida counties are collecting public input on an updated regional plan to address climate change and related challenges.

Peter Haden / WLRN

U.S. Rep. Ted Deutch, D-Boca Raton, is sponsoring a constitutional amendment to take big money out of elections.

The 28th Amendment would limit individual political contributions, require them to be disclosed and throw out the the legal notion that corporations are “people.”

“In the Citizens United decision, the Supreme Court said that corporations and wealthy people can spend an unlimited amount of money to influence our elections,” Deutch said. “The only way that we can respond to return democracy back to the people is to amend the Constitution.”

PBS

This week on The Florida Roundup...

A new study done by Florida International University's Metropolitan Center has found that despite steady wage increases for women in Miami-Dade County, women still make less in the workplace. 

Miami Herald

After more than three decades on the force, Fort Lauderdale police chief Frank Adderley is trading in his blue uniform for a green one.

He’s stepping down as the city’s top cop and stepping in-to a new role at the Broward Sheriff’s Office. He’ll join BSO as a colonel in charge of community affairs.

This week on The Florida Roundup…

A plan for a Miami Beach light rail gets a bit lighter due to high costs and pushback from the community. We discuss the challenges faced in funding public transit projects with Miami Beach City Manager Jimmy Morales and The Miami Herald’s  reporter Joey Flechas.

Listen here: 

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