breast cancer

When I went to the imaging center for my regular mammogram last year, the woman behind the desk asked me if I'd like to get a "3-D" mammogram instead of the standard test I'd had in the past.

"It's more accurate," she said.

What do you say to that? "No, thanks, I'd rather have the test that gets it wrong?" Of course, I agreed.

Peter Haden / WLRN

Two Palm Beach County organizations have a new vehicle for their message of breast cancer awareness.

Palm Tran and Susan G. Komen South Florida rolled out the “Shades of Pink” bus on Thursday, Jan. 11. It features portraits of nine Palm Beach County African-American survivors of breast cancer.

Palm Tran Executive Director Clinton Forbes said the bus could be seen by 124,000 people every day.

“Our mission and hope is that many women, by seeing this bus wrap, will get checked or decide to educate and advocate for the cause,” Forbes said.

When Annie Dennison was diagnosed with breast cancer last year, she readily followed advice from her medical team, agreeing to harsh treatments in the hope of curing her disease.

"You're terrified out of your mind" after a diagnosis of cancer, said Dennison, 55, a retired psychologist from Orange County, Calif.

In addition to lumpectomy surgery, chemotherapy and other medications, Dennison underwent six weeks of daily radiation treatments. She agreed to the lengthy radiation regimen, she said, because she had no idea there was another option.

Scientists say they may have solved a big medical mystery: why mammograms don't save more lives.

A study involving thousands of breast cancer cases, released Wednesday, concludes that a significant proportion of tumors detected through mammography are not small because they are found early.

Instead, the tumors are small because they are biologically prone to slow growth.

How do you get women who never talk about breast cancer to start opening up?

That was the question on the mind of Usman Saleemi, who along with colleagues Tiya Fazelbhoy and Jaison Ben created a bra designed to encourage breast self-examination among women in Pakistan.

According to Pink Ribbon, a national breast cancer charity based in Lahore, Pakistan has the highest incidence of breast cancer in Asia. More than 40,000 women lose their lives to the disease each year.

Women are less likely to die of breast cancer than they were a decade ago, but not all women are benefiting from that trend.

White women saw more of a drop in death rates than black women — 1.9 percent a year from 2010 to 2014, compared to a 1.5 percent decrease for black women, according to a report published Thursday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Privately insured people with cancer were diagnosed earlier and lived longer than those who were uninsured or were covered by Medicaid, according to two recent studies.

Women’s History Month

Mar 6, 2014

03/06/14 - Thursday's Topical Currents begins with recognition of Women’s History Month.  We’ll profile two outstanding South Florida seniors.  First, Maria Elena Torano.  She founded the National Hispana Leadership Institute.  Also, breast cancer specialist Dr. Vilma Biaggi.  She owns and operates South Beach’s historic Cadet Hotel . . .

3D Mammography

Aug 14, 2013

08/14/13 -  Wednesday’s Topical Currents is with Dr.