brain

For more stories like this, sign up for WBUR's weekly CommonHealth newsletter here.

Anorexia, bulimia and binge eating affect tens of millions of Americans, but eating disorders remain very difficult to treat, in part because it's not clear what goes wrong in the brain.

A little electrical brain stimulation can go a long way in boosting memory.

The key is to deliver a tiny pulse of electricity to exactly the right place at exactly the right moment, a team reports in Tuesday's Nature Communications.

"We saw a 15 percent improvement in memory," says Michael Kahana, a professor of psychology at the University of Pennsylvania and an author of the study.

We live in an age of heightened awareness about concussions. From battlefields around the world to football fields in the U.S., we've heard about the dangers caused when the brain rattles around inside the skull and the possible link between concussions and the degenerative brain disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

A brain system involved in everything from addiction to autism appears to have evolved differently in people than in great apes, a team reports Thursday in the journal Science.

The system controls the production of dopamine, a chemical messenger that plays a major role in pleasure and rewards.

People who are thinking about killing themselves appear to have distinctive brain activity that can now be measured by a computer.

In these people, words like "death" and "trouble" produce a distinctive "neural signature" not found in others, scientists report in the journal Nature Human Behaviour. More than 44,000 people commit suicide in the U.S. each year.

Scientists in Seattle have created three-dimensional computer reconstructions of living human brain cells by studying tissue that is usually discarded during surgery.

As the country starts to get back into its most popular professional team sport, there is a reminder of how dangerous football can be.

An updated study published Tuesday by the Journal of the American Medical Association on football players and the degenerative brain disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy reveals a striking result among NFL players.

What do listening to music, hitting a baseball and solving a complex math problem have in common? They all activate less gray matter than drinking wine.

The hipbone's connected to the leg bone, connected to the knee bone. That's not actually what those body parts are called, but we'll forgive you if you don't sing about the innominate bone connecting to the femur connecting to the patella. It just doesn't have the same ring to it.

http://www.randomhouse.com/

06/16/14- Monday’s Topical Currents looks at new findings regarding social neuroscience, and how the unconscious mind shapes our experience.  We often misperceive our relationships with family, friends and business associates.  We speak with the Leonard Mlodinow, author of SUBLIMINAL:  How Your Unconscious Mind Rules Your Behavior.  Think you know the hows & whys of choices?  Think again.  Only on Topical Currents, Monday at 1pm. 

The Psychopath Inside

Dec 17, 2013
The normal scan on the left is his son's. / Jim Fallon

12/17/13 - Today’s Topical Currents is with neuroscientist James Fallon.  After decades of studying human brains, he found that his own scan showed psychopathic patterns. Did he have the genes of a serial killer? He’s written THE PSYCHOPATH INSIDE:  A Neuroscientist’s Personal Journey Into the Dark Side of the Brain. That’s Topical Currents Tuesday at 1pm.

www.nealbarnard.org

03/21/13 - Thursday's Topical Currents is with chef, author and syndicated columnist Linda Gassenheimer.  She visits with Dr. Neal Barnard author of Power Foods for the Brain: An Effective 3-Step Plan to Protect Your Mind and Strengthen Your Memory.  Also, wine columnist Fred Tasker. That’s Topical Currents, Thursday at 1pm on 91.3 WLRN-HD1.

http://www.nealbarnard.org/

Video courtesy of TED Talks:

http://www.brainhealth.utdallas.edu/

01/22/13 - Tuesday's Topical Currents addresses our “cognitive potential,” with Dr. Sandra Bond Chapman, founder of the Center for Brain Health at the University of Texas at Dallas.  She says today’s “multi-tasking” culture is bad for the brain . . . and that working crosswords or Sudoku really can’t make us sharper.