books

How Much Do You Know About Florida Beer History?

Nov 20, 2014
Wikimedia Commons

Mark DeNote doesn't teach his middle school history students about beer. But he did write Florida's history of "the drink of the working class" in his book, "The Great Florida Craft Beer Guide."

Joyce Tenneson / RichardBlanco.com

From the opening pages of poet Richard Blanco’s refreshing memoir, “The Prince of Los Cocuyos: A Miami Childhood,” it’s clear that you’re not wandering Calle Ocho in one of those nostalgic, Little Havana paradises that so many Cuban-American chronicles try to recreate.

Instead, you’re wandering a Winn Dixie in Westchester.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Say you walk into an office building. On the reception desk is a nice, lush, green-leafed plant with white dots on it. You think, “how nice and outdoorsy.”

Chances are it's a deathly, toxic plant called a "dumb cane."

That's one of the tidbits included in Michael Largo's most recent publication, "The Big, Bad Book of Botany." It’s an encyclopedia-style book about botany sprinkled with surprising, funny and historical tales of plants.

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

This story is part of the New Boom series on millennials in America.

11/07/14 - Next time on South Florida Arts Beat, Pam Dearden joins us to share her excitement about a new season of concerts coming up for The Gold Coast Jazz Society.

The National Book Awards shortlists — for fiction, nonfiction, poetry and young people's literature — were announced October 15 on Morning Edition by Mitchell Kaplan, co-founder of Miami Book Fair International and former president of the American Booksellers Association. On November 18, finalists for the National Book Awards read from their nominated works at The New School in New York City. The National Book Foundation will announce the winners Wednesday night. Read more about each of the finalists — and hear the authors read from their works — below.

Write Us A Six-Word Story About South Florida

Oct 10, 2014

WLRN-Miami Herald News has partnered with Miami Book Fair International for a project called #6wordsmiami. We're asking you to submit your stories about Miami and South Florida in six words.

To provide some inspiration, we wanted to share with you a few of the stories we've seen so far and the stories behind them.

We recorded stories from attendees at a #6wordsmiami event at Book and Books in Coral Gables. Hear them below.

Miami Herald Staff

  Libraries are no longer just about the books. On Monday afternoon, that was the main point at a Knight Foundation-sponsored discussion about the future of libraries.

Libraries are exploratory labs for potential startups, spaces for interactive education and in some states, home to community gardens. These were among some of the examples at a luncheon in downtown Miami on how libraries across the nation are looking toward the future.

Comics and graphic books are flourishing these days — writers and illustrators are taking on increasingly sophisticated topics and children's authors are finding just the right balance between naughty and nice. But a number of the books have come under fire from critics who would like to see them banned from schools and libraries. That's why comics and graphic books are the focus of this year's Banned Books Week, an annual event that calls attention to challenged titles.

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