Barack Obama

What Martin Luther King Day Means To Diverse South Florida

Jan 21, 2013
Arianna Prothero


People across South Florida's diverse communities and cultures marked Martin Luther King Jr. Day. This year is also the 50th anniversary of Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech.

More than 100 people gathered at Lakeview Elementary in North Miami to celebrate MLK Day. Brent McLaughlin, executive director of Branches, one of the non profits that put on the event, said people who grew up in the United States sometimes take Dr. King's message for granted.

Nico Tucci

Today, Miami poet Richard Blanco will recite the poem he has composed for President Barack Obama's swearing-in ceremony.

How You Can Write A Poem For A President

Jan 16, 2013
alextorrenegra / flickr

Here at WLRN, we're big fans of interactive storytelling

Update at 9:45 p.m. Deal Reached

Vice President Joe Biden was meeting late Monday with Senate Democrats to brief them on a proposed deal to stop sharp tax increases and spending cuts. A source told NPR the deal with congressional Democratic and Republican leaders includes a mix of both.

Obama: Why The 'Fiscal Cliff' Hurts Latin Families

Dec 12, 2012
The White House

White House Domestic Policy Council Director Cecilia Munoz voices 

President Barack Obama’s concerns about what the impact of a failure to reach a budget agreement could mean for Latin families.

Tyjamo-old on flickr

Support for President Obama has declined so radically in South Florida that it will cost him the state on election day.

That's what Tony Man at the Sun Sentinel reported over the weekend after taking a look at modeling and projections prepared by Moody's Analytics. Moody's predicted Obama would win the Democratic strongholds of Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties but by margins too small to leverage the rest of the state.

In at least one sense, the final presidential debate of the year looked a lot like the previous ones between Mitt Romney and President Obama.

Regardless of what they were asked, each offered talking points he had prepared and was determined to make. The candidates, not moderator Bob Schieffer of CBS News, set both the tone and the pace of the debate.

That included switching gears far from the nominal subject of Monday's debate in Boca Raton, Fla., which was foreign policy. The domestic economy received at least as much attention and verbiage as Iran, Libya or China.

Foreign policy proved to be a subject that kept the tone mostly substantive tonight in the third and final debate between President Obama and Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney before the Nov. 6 election.

YouTube Screenshot

During the previous debate, our Dispatches from the Swing State team met an interesting character in a Key West pub -- a local server named Patti Wilde who is originally from Cincinnati and is something of a local celebrity.

Or, as she explains it, "I mean, I used to be. I've been here 30 years so they go, 'oh, Cincinnati Patti's here.' But now they don't do that anymore. They go, 'Larry!'"

"Larry" is Patti Wilde's cat -- a very large cat that sits calmly on the bar stool wherever she goes.

Churches Hope To Unite Flocks After Election

Oct 18, 2012
Laura Coburn

After the final vote is cast next month, the country may be in need of some healing and reconciliation.

That's the idea behind Election Day Communion.

Hundreds of churches across the country will be holding services election night and serving communion including one in South Florida.

Reverend Spencer Potter is the rector of St. Andrews Episcopal Church in Palmetto Bay.

He says the service will be a time for the whole congregation to unite.