arts

Daniel Ducassi

At a time when investors are paying record prices for land in Wynwood, real estate broker and developer David Lombardi is choosing not to build on his Wynwood properties.

    

There are more than 60 different conventions for comic book collectors, anime and Cosplay enthusiasts, toy collectors and science fiction fans in the state of Florida every year. They are relatively small affairs, nothing close to the mega-events such as Comic-Con International in San Diego, which attracts more than 100,000 fans annually.

freedigitalphotos.net/stockimages

After last year’s legislative session, Florida failed to secure the tax incentive money it needed to lure more movie and television projects to the Sunshine State.

But things could change in 2015. And Palm Beach County lawmakers want to play a starring role in replenishing those funds.

Phyllis Rose

Key West’s literary community was already gathered over the weekend for the annual Literary Seminar when they learned they had lost one of their own. Novelist Robert Stone died Saturday in Key West. He was 77.

Keith Douglas

In Broward County, it looks like a matter of “no dollars, no divas.”

South Florida’s premiere opera company says lack of funds might soon bring down the curtain on its Fort Lauderdale performances. 

Alicia Zuckerman

The museum director who helped usher in one of the most significant changes in South Florida's arts scene is leaving the Sunshine State to return to his roots.

Thom Collins is giving up his position as director of the Pérez Art Museum Miami (PAMM) to lead the acclaimed Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia.

Abhi Sharma / Flickr CC

As the year winds down, some of us find ourselves with some extra time off and maybe a little more time to read over the next few days. So we asked Miami Herald book editor Connie Ogle to tell us about some of her favorite books of 2014.

The Herald put together a top 10 list. Click here to see it.

Exclusive Borscht Premiere: "Waiting For Berta"

Dec 16, 2014
Borscht Film Festival / Courtesy

If your feet still haven't recovered from all that walking during Art Basel and Miami Art Week, we have the perfect suggestion for you: sit down, relax and enjoy a film.

And you don't even need to wait until the Borscht Film Festival kicks off on Dec. 17 to do that. For the first time at WLRN, we're premiering a movie right here on our website.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Large, colorful, fanciful glass works now dot the lush landscape of Fairchild Tropical Botanic Gardens. The pieces are Dale Chihuly’s encore to his 2005 installation at the gardens.

For this year’s show — the largest-ever for the internationally renowned artist — thousands of pieces of glass were installed at 24 sites in, among and even hanging from trees and plants. Other pieces appear to float in ponds around the gardens.

A Guide To The Most Miami Film Festival: Borscht's Ninth Edition

Dec 10, 2014
Filmmakers Bleeding Palm and Borscht Corp.

Organizers of the Borscht Film Festival say it's about telling the stories of the region by people who are from the area.

"We tell unique Florida stories, unique Miami stories," says Borscht veteran Jillian Mayer. "Miami and Florida is often portrayed a certain way in the media, and that's most likely a result of previous cinematic work that's come out of here."

Mayer says it's those Miami stereotypes that they want to avoid.

Tom Hudson

    

There are plenty of ways to measure the meaning of art: aesthetic value, emotion resonance, ticket sales, auction price, jobs. South Florida's art economy is young but growing.

Communities have invested hundreds of millions of public dollars in performing arts centers and museums, cultural programs and outreach efforts. The arts are embedded in the promise of South Florida marketed to visitors.

And increasingly, South Florida artists are appearing on the world's stage. 

Alicia Zuckerman / WLRN

  On Thursday night in  Overtown, artist Doba Afolabi was showing his work at the Art Africa show.

Afolabi is from Nigeria. He used to live in Miami, but left for Brooklyn a while ago.

Up close, his paintings look like abstracts in brightly-colored oil paint. But stand a few feet back, and a cellist in a top hat emerges. Or two saxophone players against a fiery background. One painting is called “Ride the Storm.” That’s the piece he did after his house burned down. Painting, he says, is what keeps him happy and centered.

Nadege Green / WLRN

Nora Chipaumire is in the middle of a dance workshop at the Kendall Campus of Miami Dade College.

She asks about 12 dance students of different races to define what it means to be a black man in America -- an especially weighty topic right now.

Many of the students are hesitant to try to describe the black male experience.

"I’m saying, let's go into places of inquiries," she says.

Maria Murriel / WLRN

Don and Mera Rubell, founding couple of the Rubell Family Collection, spoon-fed people little bites of cake Thursday in Wynwood, assisted by 48 servers dressed all in black.

Yes. Like Marie Antoinette.

It was a celebration of the couple's 50th wedding anniversary and also a performance-art piece by daughter Jennifer at her annual Art Basel breakfast. Every year Rubell puts on a food-related installation. Her breakfast itself is the piece of art.

    

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