arts

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If Spotify or Apple Music’s goal is to have all the world's music in one place, what would be the equivalent for visual art?

That’s the space Carter Cleveland wants to fill with his website Artsy.net, the largest online database of contemporary art. It also partners with galleries to sell art.

Cleveland spoke with WLRN’s Wilson Sayre about Artsy.net's aspirations of making art much easier to discover and enjoy. Below is an edited excerpt of their conversation: 

WLRN: Explain what Artsy.net is.

Teresa Frontado / WLRN News

In Syria, gardens have been transformed into graveyards where protesters killed during the uprising against the Assad regime are buried. Lebanese-British artist Tania El Khoury imagined that "if we press our ear to the ground, we are able to hear these stories." 

WLRN News

A yellow wall divides Northwest 12th Ave along the east side of the Liberty Square housing projects.

The wall is no more than three feet tall at it's highest point and on the other side is a raised street making the wall only visible if you're in the housing projects.

Terence Shepherd

By his own admission, Dr. Rolando Ochoa is not much of an air traveler.

But on a flight to San Diego a few years ago, it occurred to the Miami Dade College professor just what a trip his life has been so far. And the legs of the journey were far from ordinary: from child star in his native Cuba. to political refugee in his late teens, to budding music artist, to banker, to educator.

Now, they serve as chapters in his book, “Cuba 18, U.S. 50: My Fifty Year Trip.”

Stan Roenning

The play has no special effects, no pyrotechnics and hardly any scenery. Its minimalist approach has the actors miming certain everyday activities without the use of props. But Thornton Wilder’s “Our Town,” has stood the test of time.

 

Omar Cruz / Estefan Enterprises

Miami is set to represent at Washington’s glittering 40th annual Kennedy Center Honors in December when singer-songwriter Gloria Estefan becomes the latest hometown icon to receive the prestigious award and the first Cuban-American to earn the distinction.

Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Edward Albee has been in the news a lot lately. Albee died in 2016, and since then his estate has turned down a multi-racial production of Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and put his contemporary art collection up for auction for an estimated $9 million.

Carron Case / WLRN

Twenty-six years ago, Debra Lombard gave a hand to a friend who needed help teaching a theater class to children with special needs. The experience changed her life forever and marked the beginning of the Exceptional Theater Company (ETC). 

The director John Woo, whose filmography contains an aggregate body count in the quadruple digits, has frequently observed that action movies and musicals are close cousins. He's right about that, and I offer into evidence Edgar Wright's intoxicating new chase flick Baby Driver as Exhibit A.

Art Students League of New York

There are plenty of ways to mark a trip along the Florida Keys. The famous Overseas Highway bridges. An underwater shipwreck trail.

Now a new trail is going up along the island chain — a sculpture trail.

Conservatives won't have Julius Caesar to kick around anymore.

The latest production in the Public Theater's Shakespeare in the Park series is closing Sunday — presumably bringing an end to demonstrations outside of the Delacorte Theater but unlikely to quell the raging debates over exactly whom is entitled to free speech, under what circumstances and over the limits of artistic expression. Those debates are not likely to subside, especially as the appetite for creative works tackling an array of political themes continues to grow.

Rakesh Satyal's new novel checks off a lot of boxes, but its charm lies in the fact that it wears all of it various identities so lightly. This is an immigration story, a coming-out story and something of an old-school feminist story about a timid woman learning to roar.

The Sunroom: A Place For Young Miami Poets

May 3, 2017
Priscila Serrano / WLRN

Elementary students from three Liberty City schools spent the last two months meeting once a week to write poetry, and some of it has ended up in some unusual places. Like gas stations. And buses. 

“Poetry asks kids to come up with innovative ideas. It encourages them to think outside the box instead of asking them to zero in on a definition or answer to a test question,” said Laurel Nakanishi, teacher and coordinator of the program that added poetry to the kids’ curriculum.

Nadege Green / WLRN

Michael Brun grew up in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. As a kid, he remembers the pulsing and intoxicating rhythms that washed over the neighborhood every weekend in the form of rara bands--musicians beating drums, blowing handmade horns, clapping and singing through the streets.

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