arts

Painting
8:11 am
Mon August 12, 2013

The Eye-Catching Murals, Mermaids Of Painter 'Tati' Suarez

Tatiana Suarez

At the beginning of this summer, artist Tatiana Suarez moved back to her native city of Miami from Brooklyn, where she and her husband resided for four and half years.

Prior to her big move back to the Sunshine State, Suarez was already in talks with the Hollywood Community Redevelopment Agency to participate in the city's downtown mural project.

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Painting
7:22 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Florida's Highwaymen Painted Idealized Landscapes In Jim Crow South

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 1:26 pm

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

And if you're just joining us, this is WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Jacki Lyden.

In the winter of 2012, I came across a story on a drive through central coastal Florida in the town of Fort Pierce. Route 1 is now dominated by strip malls and fading condos, but the Florida of the 1950s and '60s was a candy-colored Eisenhower, Kennedy space-age dream of flaming red Poinciana trees and untamed beaches.

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Academics
8:27 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Why There's An Atmosphere Of Crisis In The Humanities

The number of humanities majors are in rapid decline, as is students' interest in reading and -- interestingly -- reading test scores.

“Why do we have to learn this?” Every teacher has heard a student ask this question.  It is often followed with, “When will I ever use this?” 

Perhaps anyone who was ever a student – i.e. all of us – has either uttered or thought the very same thing.  And they are indeed valid questions.

After all, when will the average person need to calculate the square root of an imaginary number? Or determine how many moles of oxide are in a substance? Or explain the difference between Aristotelian and Shakespearean tragedies? 

In all honesty, the answer is probably never.

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Language
1:18 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

How I Learned To Swear In Cuban

Guillermo Álvarez Guedes, the Cuban comic who made a common Cuban expletive his trademark, died last week in Miami at age 86.
Gaston De Cardenas/El Nuevo Herald MCT via Getty Images

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 11:38 am

Editor's note: Fair warning — this essay is, in part, about Spanish profanities, and it includes several.

The man who taught me to swear in Cuban died last week.

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Music
1:17 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

Natalie Cole Records Dad Nat King Cole’s Spanish-Language Classics

When she was 8 years old, Natalie Cole went to Mexico City with her father. And while Nat King Cole’s daughter was accustomed to his stardom, she was startled by the adulation he received.

“The people thronged to see him as we were walking the streets — he was like a king,” says Cole, leaning back on a sofa at a Wynwood music studio last week.

It was her first trip to Mexico, but the city’s plazas and her first piñata were less memorable than the crowds’ enthusiasm.

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The Sunshine Economy
1:15 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Video: How A Miami Designer Fashions His Workforce

Designer Rene Ruiz (left) instructs workers on the finer points of dress making.
Credit Tom Hudson

Designing high fashion is an art. So is making those designs into dresses.

Designer Rene Ruiz does both from a low-slung building in Hialeah. His factory is tucked in with furniture makers and hurricane shutters installers. About 50 people work there making dresses for Ruiz's well-heeled clients in South Florida and for his dresses destined for Neiman Marcus stores.

RELATED: The Sunshine Economy: Fashion

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Real Estate
7:35 am
Mon July 29, 2013

Miami Beach Preservationists Battle Glitterati Over Homes

This house owned by a plastic surgeon and his wife, a cast member on The Real Housewives of Miami, is the poster child for efforts to stop runaway demolitions in Miami Beach.
Courtesy of Arthur Marcus

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 12:35 pm

Some of Miami Beach's quietest and most historic neighborhoods can be found in a chain of small islands connected by a causeway. On Di Lido Island, a community of homes built 50 and 60 years ago is being torn down and replaced, lot by lot. On one street alone, five houses currently are slated for demolition.

Daniel Ciraldo stands across the street from two '60s-era houses that will soon be demolished and replaced by a new home nearly double their combined size.

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Food
2:08 pm
Sat July 27, 2013

When Asian And Latin Food Collide: Spicy, Tasty Or Confused?

Green beans with peanuts and chile de arbol
Courtesy Pati Jinich

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 2:20 pm

Asian-Americans and Latinos trace their roots half a world away from each other — literally. But their cultures, and especially the foods they love, have more in common than you might think. These days, they're colliding in new and interesting ways – from Korean barbecue taco trucks to finer dining.

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Music
5:00 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

Legendary Brazilian Singer To Play Free Show July 27 In Hollywood

Credit RhythmFoundation.com

From the favelas of Brazil to the main stages of North America, legendary Brazilian singer-songwriter Seu Jorge will perform a free show this Saturday at the Hollywood ArtsPark.

Opening sets are by the Brazilian Voices choir and Rose Max's samba set.

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History
2:44 pm
Tue July 23, 2013

Old Postcards Offer Glimpse Of South Florida's Appealing (And Appalling) History

Postcard, circa 1930. The Hotel New Yorker boasts a "Swimming Pool" and "Air Conditioning"
Liz Coursen, americanpostcardart.com

In this digital age, when vacationers to South Florida can grab their smartphones and send jealousy-inducing photos to friends and family within seconds, it’s hard to believe the humble postcard is still hanging in there.

Visit most any local souvenir shop and there they are, usually on one or two racks tucked behind the seashell bracelets and painted coconuts.  But Sarasota author Liz Coursen doesn’t think much of the postcards being sent from Florida these days.

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Literature
8:24 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Scrapbooks From Hemingway's Childhood Made Public

A page in which Hemingway's mother describes his birth.
Credit John F. Kennedy Presidential Library

On the 114th anniversary of Ernest Hemingway’s birth on June 21, Key West wasn’t alone in celebrating the author’s life. The John F. Kennedy Presidential Library announced that it would release five scrapbooks in digital form that document Hemingway’s childhood.

Seen by very few people, the scrapbooks had been in secure storage for decades due to their fragility.

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Television
8:03 am
Tue July 23, 2013

In The Summer, Univision Is Numero Uno

Pitbull and Jennifer Lopez recently performed on Univision's Premios Juventud.
Rodrigo Varela Univision

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 9:32 am

For three consecutive weeks this summer, Spanish-language TV network Univision won the prime-time ratings among young adult viewers. The network is bragging about its prime-time ratings domination with full-page ads in the LA Times, New York Times and Wall Street Journal. Its English-language video exclaims: "For the first time ever, Univision is now the number one network in any language."

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South Florida Arts Beat
1:00 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

ArtServe, Symphony of the Americas, Coral Gables Art Cinema, A Word On Food and Broward Arts

ArtServe

07/12/13 - Next time on South Florida Arts Beat, the non-profit, ArtServe, greatly helps out South Florida’s artists. President Jaye Abbate has the details. Maestro Brooks-Bruzzese speaks with Charles Greenfield about upcoming concerts throughout South Florida by The Symphony of the Americas. Film critic, Dan Hudak, talks to founder and president Steven Krams and director Robert Rosenberg about an exciting season for the Coral Gables Art Cinema.

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Literature
6:30 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Contemplating The End Of Books (As We Know Them)

Antonia Wright and Ruben Millares
Credit Antonia Wright/Ruben Millares/Spinello Projects Miami

With budget cuts impacting public libraries all over the country, this summer is not only your traditional reading season – it’s also a time for thinking about reading.

The State of the Book at Spinello Projects will exhibit physical books as precious, engaging objects – works of art you can touch – and will encourage people to sit, read and ruminate on the future of printed matter.

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Sculpture
1:00 pm
Fri July 5, 2013

Miami Beach Botanical Garden Transformed Into African 'Sculpture Park'

"Silent Pride" by Brian Nyanhongo
Arianna Prothero

Sculpting is a family affair for Zimbabwe based artist Brian Nyanhongo and his siblings. He's one of 19 kids, eight of whom followed in their dad's footsteps and became Shona sculptors. Several works from the Nyanhongo family are currently on display at the Miami Beach Botanical Gardens

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