art

Kate Stein / WLRN

Lineth Mardomingo, a third-grader at Coral Terrace Elementary School, calls her latest piece of art, "Spinny Scroll." The piece is inspired by a memory: the time she dropped a crayon on the floor and saw it spinning, then kept spinning it and spinning it and then started spinning herself, and then bumped into a wooden bed.

"That was a long time ago and I was, like, 5," Lineth says. Now older and wiser, she says the colors she chose for her piece -- dark blue and light purple -- are the same colors as the crayons in that memory.

Nancy Klingener / WLRN

  Key West has a lot of signs denoting historic sites. Most point to events and places of significance since Europeans settled the island in the early 19th century.

For the month of March, four new signs point further back into the island's history. They are works of public art by Edgar Heap Of Birds and are part of his Native Host series.

Audrey Armitage

 

Jennifer Rubell celebrated love with bread and butter at her 13th annual Art Basel breakfast in Wynwood on Thursday. Each year, the artist and daughter of prominent art collectors  Don and Mera Rubell,  feeds guests with a new food-related performance art piece.

Art Miami

Among the elaborate parties and gallery exhibits that come to South Florida every year for Miami Art Week, last year an usual heist became it’s own cause célèbre.

Art crimes make up a $6 billion industry worldwide and, in general, if stolen art doesn’t turn up within the first few months, it could be be a long time before it does. 

THE THEFT

Art Miami 2014 was David Smith’s fifth time at the art fair with his Amsterdam-based Gallery, Leslie Smith. 

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Wynwood is known for its world-renowned street art, but this month it has also been the temporary home of influential museum art in the form of etchings from Pablo Picasso in a show called La Tauromaquia.

Hanging inside the Bakehouse Art Complex, the 26 pieces look like black and white watercolor paintings—they’re actually etchings printed on paper—and depict a scene from a bullfight.

Audrey Armitage. Art by Nick Gilmore

The city of Miami is rich with artistic, architectural and historic detail, but what can be learned from the streets themselves? Local artist Nick Gilmore explores the heavily used, but often forgotten, city streets in his new print series, “Paper Pavement.”

Gilmore, an adjunct professor of printmaking at Florida International University, takes a close look at the details of aging city streets, transforming crumbling street tops into textured prints that capture a unique piece of Miami’s history.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

  Five-year-old Brian Eberhardt sits watching cartoons at gate D7 at Miami International Airport.

But he’s not watching them on a phone, a tablet or even the television hanging from the ceiling. The cartoons are being projected from an old-school, 16mm reel-to-reel projector.

“It looks like a camera off a TV,” says Brian, who has never seen anything like the projector in real life.

The machine lights up a portable projection screen with Goofy and Donald Duck episodes from the 1950s.

Courtesy / Fringe Projects Miami

When Emile Milgrim left Miami for Oregon in 2003, she recalls a different kind of city.

“There weren’t a lot of people living in downtown Miami, Midtown, Little Haiti, North Miami, MiMo, whatever you want to call that stuff,” she says. “And then now there are, so it looks and sounds different.”

Take the single word – sacrifice – and turn it into a three-dimensional sculpture that represents veterans, military service members and first responders like police and firefighters.

It’s a tall order. But a challenge that more than 50 Polk County high school art students took on for this year’s Platform Art competition. 

This is the second year of the three-year Platform Art project. The prize, besides bragging rights, is having the top sculpture each year, produced and permanently placed in the Lakeland's Veterans’ Memorial Park.

Nadege Green / WLRN

This is a story about a mermaid.

A vigilante-environmentalist mermaid, and she can't stay quiet any longer. She needs people to stop polluting South Florida’s waters.

“She’s the daughter of the goddess of the sea known as Yemaya in Cuba and the Caribbean,” says Elizabeth Doud.

In her one-woman show, Doud transforms into Siren Jones, the mermaid.

Art Installation Explores Human Desire For Flight

Aug 19, 2015
Eleonora Edreva / WLRN

In a room full of sand, Michael Namkung is exploring his body’s relationship to flight. 

The Miami artist’s new work “Flying Towards the Ground” is opening at Locust Projects, an art gallery in the Design District. The piece is the result of an intersection between his long history of dreams about flying and falling and 20 years of playing ultimate frisbee — a sport in which the motion of “flight” occurs often.

American Black Film Fest Returns To Miami For Good

Aug 12, 2015
Ginny Gutierrez / Courtesy

The American Black Film Fest has announced its return to Miami Beach for its 20th anniversary next year. 

Originally envisioned as a destination event, founder Jeff Friday says the festival may be ready to settle down here.

Friday cited Miami’s “culture, logistics, and accessibility” as fitting the needs of the festival’s community, and as the main reason for his decision to choose the city as a permanent home.

Ginger Photography Inc. / Locust Projects

A group of Florida teens is embracing their inner "Florida Man" with an art exhibition at Miami's Locust Projects which, every summer for the last six years, has handed its gallery over to high-schoolers for the Locust Arts Builders program.

How The University Of Miami Uses Art To Train Future Doctors

Jul 29, 2015
UM Lowe Art Museum / Courtesy

The University of Miami is adding Baroque paintings and Greek vases to its diagnostic arsenal.

Medical, nursing and physical therapy students at UM are supplementing their clinical training with visits to the Lowe Art Museum at the university’s Coral Gables campus. There, they discuss works of art in small groups and make connections to health care.

Hope Torrents, the Lowe’s school programs coordinator, calls these visits the Fine Art of Health Care. She runs the workshops, which began in 2008.

Alexander Gonzalez / WLRN

Alba Prieto says life with her son Daniel can be a “roller coaster.”

“One day you’re up, one day you’re down,” she says. “But at the end of the day, at the end of the roller coaster, you feel super excited about what you have been doing.”

Daniel Varela, 10, was diagnosed with autism at 3 years old. It’s a spectrum disorder (one with varying degrees of severity) that can make communication and social interaction challenging. 

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