Amendment 1

This week on The Florida Roundup…

A plan for a Miami Beach light rail gets a bit lighter due to high costs and pushback from the community. We discuss the challenges faced in funding public transit projects with Miami Beach City Manager Jimmy Morales and The Miami Herald’s  reporter Joey Flechas.

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Opponents of Amendment One are calling on the Florida Supreme Court to block the initiative less than a week before Election Day.  The group Floridians for Solar Choice believes amendment backers misled voters and the Court.

Kyle Holsten / WLRN

What do climate change and Halloween have in common?

 

They're both pretty scary, according to people at a climate rally Sunday in downtown Miami.

 

A traveling protest against Florida’s solar Amendment 1 launched Tuesday in Jacksonville.  The boat covered in solar panels will stop in high-trafficked areas as it heads south.


Miami Herald

  This week on The Florida Roundup...

We bring you the latest information on the developing weather in the Caribbean with Meteorologist Jeff Huffman.

Next, a week after Miami Beach is declared a Zika zone, the virus has infected local politics as new cases are found along the Gulf Coast of Florida. Who exactly is in-charge of getting timely information out to the public? Is it the Governor? Is it the Department of Health? WLRN's Sammy Mack and Jenny Staletovich with the Miami Herald join for this segment. 

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Roberto Koltun / El Nuevo Herald

Three environmental groups filed a lawsuit this week -- with the state legislature as their target. The coalition claims lawmakers shortchanged environmental spending in this year's budget, going against the will of the voters.

The coalition is made up of the Florida Wildlife Federation, the St. Johns Riverkeeper and the Environmental Confederation of Southwest Florida. These groups claim lawmakers put millions of dollars that should go to buying land for conservation efforts, and used it for expenses not allowed by Amendment 1.

Earl Leatherberry/flickr

Florida voters passed Amendment 1 last November, and funding to carry out the amendment was considered a priority when lawmakers went into the regular session in March. The amendment is also known as the Water and Land Conservation Initiative.

For the next 20 years, the amendment requires that one–third of the revenue from a real estate tax known as documentary stamps goes toward environmental preservation.

lolo35352000/flickr

Florida voters overwhelmingly approved Amendment 1 last November. The citizen-led initiative is also known as the Florida Water and Land Conservation Amendment. It sets aside 33 percent of the revenue from documentary stamps - a real estate transaction fee - for the next 20 years to fund environmental protection.

The fees are worth $750 million next year. But the Florida Legislature is dragging its feet on setting rules to divvy up the funds.

Rick Stone

For a lot of Florida voters and a lot of environmentalists, one of the big disappointments of this chaotic legislative session is the apparent fate of Amendment 1. That's the ballot initiative that makes three-quarters of a billion dollars available every year to buy and protect sensitive lands. But it's a shopping trip the Legislature doesn't feel like making.

Rick Stone

Every county in South Florida has big problems for the Legislature to solve this year. Some of them you may know about, some are pretty obscure. But all found their way on to lists of legislative priorities that the various county delegations brought with them this year to Tallahassee.

Amendment 1 Spending Plan Lands Mixed Reviews

Mar 19, 2015

Florida's natural springs would get $50 million, the Kissimmee River is in line for $30 million, and a wastewater plan for the Florida Keys is up for $25 million, under a newly released House proposal that would help carry out a voter-approved increase in conservation dollars.

Lawmakers Wade into Amendment 1 Details

Feb 27, 2015

New rules for Florida waters will be one of the first bills the House takes up when the legislative session gets underway.

But don't expect that all aspects of a voter-approved initiative to conserve water and land will sail smoothly through the 60-day session that begins March 3.

As House members and senators hammer out new rules and new funding levels required by the initiative, known as Amendment 1, a wide array of suggestions has poured in from Gov. Rick Scott, Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam, environmentalists and business lobbyists.