alt-right

Getty Images via Miami Herald

The University of Florida signaled that white nationalist Richard Spencer will be allowed to rent space on campus — but at a new date yet to be determined.

The move, announced Friday, came as the university faced a First Amendment lawsuit over a controversial event originally planned for Sept. 12.

It was all, in effect, over before it even began.

In the face of overwhelming popular and political opposition, a far-right activist canceled a press conference hastily scheduled for Saturday afternoon that some feared would provoke violent confrontations in the heart of San Francisco. This came less than 18 hours after organizers also called off two highly publicized right-wing rallies planned for the Bay Area this weekend.

Last weekend, when white nationalists descended on Charlottesville to protest, it was clear that almost exclusively white, young males comprised the so-called alt-right movement — there were women, but very few.

So where were the white women who weren't out protesting in the streets?

For the most part, journalist Seyward Darby discovered, they're online.

Miami Herald

Florida ranks No. 2  in the list of U.S. states with the most active hate groups. The most recent Hate Map, put out regularly by the Southern Poverty Law Center, shows 63 hate groups operating from Pensacola to Miami. 

Fernando Llano / AP via Miami Herald

COMMENTARY

By now everybody knows the bigly favor President Trump did the Alt-Right this week.

On Tuesday, like a bad parent defending his skinhead bully kid in the principal’s office, Trump insisted the deadly mayhem that torch-carrying white supremacists wrought in Charlottesville, Virginia, over the weekend wasn’t all their fault.

Associated Press

The University of Florida is refusing to allow white nationalist leader Richard Spencer to speak on campus next month, citing “serious concerns” about safety in the aftermath of a deadly weekend clash in Charlottesville, Va.

In a message to staff Wednesday morning, university President Kent Fuchs said the decision to deny the National Policy Institute's request to rent space on campus came “after assessing potential risks” with campus, state, local and federal law enforcement officials.

South Florida Holds Peace Vigils In Response To Violence In Charlottesville

Aug 14, 2017
Peter Haden / WLRN News

In communities across South Florida, people gathered on Sunday evening to pray for peace and honor those killed in the violence during a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia.

It didn't take long for a photo of a throng of torch-wielding white supremacists to go viral. The picture from Friday night captured the faces of young (mostly) men who had descended onto the University of Virginia's campus to protest the pending removal of a nearby statue of Robert E.

Christian Picciolini says he was a "lost and lonely" teenager when he was recruited by a white nationalist group. Picciolini immersed himself in the organization's ideology and by age 16, he had emerged as the leader of a group called the Chicago Area Skinheads. He even helped recruit others to the cause. That is until, he says, he had an awakening after the birth of his first child.

Updated at 3:15 p.m. ET

A day after a rally of white nationalists turned violent in Charlottesville, Va., Gov. Terry McAuliffe said there is "no place" for such hateful people in the United States as he called on President Trump to more strongly condemn the perpetrators.

Updated at 7:52 p.m. ET

A man who appeared to be protesting Saturday with a group of self-proclaimed fascists is accused of killing a woman and injuring multiple others by driving his car into a crowd of marchers in Charlottesville, Va.

Updated at 6 p.m. ET

One day after a car plowed into a group of people protesting a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Va., the victim of that attack has been identified as Heather Heyer. The Charlottesville resident was 32 years old.

Two state troopers, Pilot Lt. H. Jay Cullen and Trooper-Pilot Berke M.M. Bates, also died Saturday, when their helicopter crashed en route to the scene of the violence. Dozens of other people were treated for injuries throughout the day, including 19 from the car crash.

Updated Aug. 13 at 10:50 a.m. ET

Political leaders used Twitter to respond to the violent confrontations that began Friday night in Charlottesville, Va.; continued with a "Unite the Right" rally that pitted members of the alt-right, Ku Klux Klan and neo-Nazi groups against anti-racism counterprotesters on Saturday; and turned deadly when a car plowed into a group of pedestrians.

Updated Aug. 12 at 10:04 p.m. ET

Three people died and about 35 were injured in a day of violence that began with clashes at a white nationalist rally on Saturday in Charlottesville, Va., Gov. Terry McAuliffe said.

One of those killed was a 32-year-old female pedestrian who was hit by a car that plowed into marchers, authorities said. The driver of the car, James Alex Fields is being held on charges including second degree murder. Police say he's from Ohio.

White nationalist Richard Spencer's speech at Alabama's Auburn University was preceded by controversy and punctuated Tuesday night by protests, arrests and some violence.

Hundreds of people, some chanting and carrying signs, demonstrated outside Auburn's Foy Hall on Tuesday. City of Auburn police Capt. Lorenza Dorsey told NPR that three people were arrested on disorderly conduct charges.

Video posted by AL.com shows one man lying bloodied on the ground before being led away handcuffed by police.

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